Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
29%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
8%
1200 - 1500 GB
8%
1500 - 2000 GB
11%
> 2000 GB
24%
Total votes: 79

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Comic for December 06, 2019

Dilbert - December 7, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

The “burp-talking” in Rick and Morty isn’t as meaningless as you might think

Ars Technica - 47 min 56 sec ago

Enlarge / Constant burping is one of the defining features of mad scientist Rick Sanchez on Rick and Morty. (credit: Adult Swim/Comedy Central)

Eccentric mad scientist Rick Sanchez, of Rick and Morty fame, is as notorious for his constant mid-speech belching as he is for his brilliantly eccentric inventions—and for routinely dragging grandson Morty into highly dangerous situations. Now, paralinguistic researcher Brooke Kidner of the University of Southern California has made the first acoustical analysis of Rick's unique speech patterns. She described her work at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America this week in San Diego.

“Paralinguistics have been shown to carry significant meaning when inserted into conversation, and being able to understand the meanings of these less common sounds can lead to a greater understanding of natural language processing," Kidner said at a press conference.

Kidner's unusual study began with a phonetics seminar course at USC, focusing on non-speech sounds that occur in human speech—groans, gasps, sighs, the infamous "Loser!" sneeze, and so forth—and how we attribute meaning to them (sarcasm, for instance). The instructor noted that burps were an example of non-speech sounds with no meaning. Kidner brought up Rick Sanchez's constant mid-sentence burps in Rick and Morty as a counter-argument, and the instructor encouraged her to investigate further.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Social media platforms leave 95% of reported fake accounts up, study finds

Ars Technica - 1 hour 37 min ago

Enlarge / One hundred cardboard cutouts of Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg stand outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, April 10, 2018. (credit: SAUL LOEB | AFP | Getty Images)

It's no secret that every major social media platform is chock-full of bad actors, fake accounts, and bots. The big companies continually pledge to do a better job weeding out organized networks of fake accounts, but a new report confirms what many of us have long suspected: they're pretty terrible at doing so.

The report comes this week from researchers with the NATO Strategic Communication Centre of Excellence (StratCom). Through the four-month period between May and August of this year, the research team conducted an experiment to see just how easy it is to buy your way into a network of fake accounts and how hard it is to get social media platforms to do anything about it.

The research team spent €300 (about $332) to purchase engagement on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, the report (PDF) explains. That sum bought 3,520 comments, 25,750 likes, 20,000 views, and 5,100 followers. They then used those interactions to work backward to about 19,000 inauthentic accounts that were used for social media manipulation purposes.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 23:19.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com