Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
19%
200 - 500 GB
27%
500 - 800 GB
4%
800 - 1200 GB
7%
1200 - 1500 GB
7%
1500 - 2000 GB
12%
> 2000 GB
25%
Total votes: 85

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Comic for April 07, 2020

Dilbert - April 8, 2020 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Ars analysis: ~80% of Steam games earn under $5K in first two weeks

Ars Technica - 29 min 40 sec ago

It has been roughly two years now since Valve shut off the source of Steam Spy's huge, randomly sampled sales estimates and promised a "more accurate and more useful" replacement to come. We got our first glimpse of what that replacement might entail today, as Valve gave a rare glimpse into its treasure trove of aggregate sales data across thousands of PC games.

The blog post sharing that data correctly points out that the raw number of games finding some minimum level of sales success on Steam has increased vastly since 2012 (when Valve launched Steam Greenlight and loosened its tight control of what games could appear on the storefront). But Valve's selective view of the data leaves out a huge mass of games that make less than $5,000 in their first two weeks on Steam's virtual shelves. An Ars analysis finds those titles have made up the vast majority of Steam releases for the last five years.

Filling in the holes

To get at that data for the charts above, we started with the graphs Valve itself provided in its blog post today. These lay out the number of games making over $5,000, $10,000, $50,000, $100,000, and $250,000 in their first two weeks, respectively, by release year. I used photo editing software to measure and convert the bars in those graphs into raw numbers, but the actual numbers may be off by a fraction of a percentage point from Valve's internal benchmarks (we didn't decipher the graphs for 2005 and 2006, when the total number of Steam releases was too small to draw much meaningful data).

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

University libraries offer online “lending” of scanned in-copyright books

Ars Technica - 1 hour 4 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Sethanan Saengsawang / EyeEm / Getty)

The coronavirus crisis has forced the closure of libraries around the world, depriving the public of access to millions of printed books. Books old enough to be in the public domain may be available for free download online. Many recent books are available to borrow in e-book form. But there are many other books—especially those published in the mid-to-late 20th century—that are hard to access without going to a physical library.

A consortium of university libraries called HathiTrust recently announced a solution to this problem, called the Emergency Temporary Access Service. It allows participating HathiTrust member libraries to offer their patrons digital scans of books that they can "check out" and read online.

HathiTrust has a history of pushing the boundaries of copyright. It was the defendant in a landmark 2014 ruling that established the legality of library book scanning. At the time, HathiTrust was only allowing people with print disabilities to access the full text of scanned books. Now HathiTrust is expanding access to more people—though still with significant limits.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Coronavirus: 'Reading about virus online makes me anxious'

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 22 min ago
Parents are urged to consider their children's mental health as they are kept indoors.

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 19:36.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com