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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
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500 - 800 GB
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800 - 1200 GB
9%
1200 - 1500 GB
12%
1500 - 2000 GB
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> 2000 GB
21%
Total votes: 34

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Comic for December 14, 2018

Dilbert - December 15, 2018 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Japan Plans For 100ft Tsunami

Slashdot - 10 min 58 sec ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Nearly 100 Lyft drivers sue, complaining of illegally being paid too little

Ars Technica - 1 hour 5 min ago

Enlarge / Sticker for Lyft on the back of a Lyft ride-sharing vehicle in the Silicon Valley town of Santa Clara, California, August 17, 2017. (credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Several dozen Lyft drivers across California have filed a new labor lawsuit against the ride-hailing company, arguing—like many before them—that they are being inadequately paid.

According to the lawsuit, Abdeljabbar et al. v. Lyft, which was filed in federal court in San Francisco on Wednesday, drivers are being paid “less than $8 per hour.” That’s far less than the California minimum wage of $11 per hour, and even further behind the minimum in some other Golden State cities, which mandate even higher pay.

A substantial portion of the drivers' lawsuit is based on a May 2018 decision by the California Supreme Court known as Dynamex.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ofcom asks networks, ISPs: Hey, wouldn't it be nice if you let customers know the best deal once their contract's up?

The Register - 1 hour 25 min ago
You know, they've paid for the phone a few times over now...

UK regulator Ofcom wants ISPs and networks to tell customers when they're contract is up and inform them of better deals. The consultation (PDF) was launched today alongside a review of broadband prices.…

Don’t buy a 5G smartphone—at least, not for a while

Ars Technica - 1 hour 25 min ago

Enlarge / 5G is here, but that doesn't mean you have to buy into it.

2019 is going to be the year of 5G—at least, that's what the cellular industry keeps saying. We're going to see the launch of several 5G smartphones from OEMs like Samsung, Motorola, and OnePlus, and carriers will be tripping over themselves to tell you how awesome their new 5G networks are despite coming with a slew of asterisks. I would like to make something up about how ridiculous the 5G hype has gotten, but it's hard to top actual quotes from industry executives, like Verizon's claim that 5G will "dramatically improve our global society." Faster mobile Internet is coming, but should you care about it yet?

Qualcomm recently had its big 2019 chip announcement, and as the world's biggest provider of smartphone chips, that gives us a good idea of what the upcoming 5G hardware will look like. The industry is doing its best to hype 5G up as The Next Big Thing™, but 5G hardware in 2019 is going to be a decidedly first-generation affair. Early adopters for 5G will have to accept all manner of tradeoffs. And when there might not even be 5G reception in your area, it might be better to just wait the whole thing out for a year or two.

A 5G mmWave primer: Making use of the spectrum that nobody wanted

"5G" is a shorthand reference to the next generation of cellular network technology that is launching in 2019. The whole "G" naming scheme started in the 1990s with the launch of GSM, which was called the "second generation"—aka "2G"—of mobile networking technology. GSM upgraded early networks from analog to digital, and those old analog networks were retroactively given the name "1G." Since then, we've gotten new "G" numbers with major coordinated network upgrades about every 10 years. These iterations brought important features like SMS and MMS messages, IP-based networking and mobile Internet, and, of course, more speed.

Read 33 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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