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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
29%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
7%
1200 - 1500 GB
7%
1500 - 2000 GB
13%
> 2000 GB
23%
Total votes: 69

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Comic for July 17, 2019

Dilbert - 0 sec ago
Categories: Geek

Microsoft To Explore Using Rust

Slashdot - 18 min 8 sec ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Painted-on salt provides glowing thermometer for tiny things

Ars Technica - July 17, 2019 - 9:37pm

Enlarge (credit: PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)

Temperature is notoriously difficult to measure, mostly because it's an average quantity. The temperature of a room is often recorded at a single point, when it's meant to be a measure of the average energy of the air in the room—a room that will have spatial and temporal fluctuations around that average.

As anyone who has argued over the thermostat will know, measuring the average is difficult enough. But what if I want to measure the actual fluctuations and temperature differences in the room? Then I need a thermometer that provides a temperature image.

You might be thinking "get an IR camera, dummy." But there is a much cooler option than an infrared camera. It's a (nearly) normal camera coupled with a laser that measures temperature from the emission of visible light.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US. The data is out—and it’s horrific

Ars Technica - July 17, 2019 - 9:12pm

Enlarge / Members of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters hold signs while protesting during the McKesson Corp. annual meeting at the Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce in Irving, Texas, US, on Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (credit: Getty | Bloomberg)

Between 2006 and 2012, opioid drug makers and distributors flooded the country with 76 billion pills of oxycodone and hydrocodone—highly addictive opioid pain medications that sparked the epidemic of abuse and overdoses that killed nearly 100,000 people in that time period.

As the epidemic surged over the seven-year period, so did the supply. The companies increased distribution from 8.4 billion in 2006 to 12.6 billion in 2012, a jump of roughly 50%. In all, the deluge of pills was enough to supply every adult and child in the country with around 36 opioid pills per year. Just a 10-day supply can hook 1 in 5 people into being long-term users, researchers have determined.

The stunning supply figures were first reported by the Washington Post and come from part of a database compiled by the Drug Enforcement Administration that tracked the fate of every opioid pill sold in America, from manufacturers to individual pharmacies. A federal court in Ohio released the data this week as part of a massive consolidated court case against nearly two-dozen opioid makers and distributors, brought by nearly 2,000 cities, towns, and counties. The local governments allege that the opioid companies conspired to saturate the country with the potent painkillers to soak up billions in profits. The companies deny the allegations, arguing generally that they were serving the needs of patients.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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