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IDG Contributor Network: Dell shifts security focus to data itself

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 4:15pm

Brett Hansen, vice president of Data Security Solutions at Dell, calls it his “Mona Lisa.” It may not be as pretty as the artwork, but Dell Data Guardian is pretty sweet nonetheless. What Hansen and colleagues have been laboring mightily to bring forth is a security suite that wraps encryption, complete with policy details, around each and every byte in a customer’s data store.

That way, not only is data encrypted in flight and at rest, but individual files have their own encryption and policies. Until now, data-loss-prevention products have been the answer, but they don’t stop simple export of potentially sensitive data.

Key to Dell Data Guardian is that its attributes are tied to specific file types. When it was first introduced in December 2016, the suite worked just with Microsoft Office documents, but it will be extended to other types in future releases. Expected in August is .pdf, and .csv and .txt will come out in November. Next year, picture formats like .jpg will be introduced as well as specialty types like .cad and .cam.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Shadow Brokers teases more Windows exploits and cyberespionage data

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 4:13pm

A group of hackers that previously leaked alleged U.S. National Security Agency exploits claims to have even more attack tools in its possession and plans to release them in a new subscription-based service.

The group also has intelligence gathered by the NSA on foreign banks and ballistic missile programs, it said.

The Shadow Brokers was responsible for leaking EternalBlue, the Windows SMB exploit that was used by attackers in recent days to infect hundreds of thousands of computers around the world with the WannaCry ransomware program.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Shadow Brokers teases more Windows exploits and cyberespionage data

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 4:13pm

A group of hackers that previously leaked alleged U.S. National Security Agency exploits claims to have even more attack tools in its possession and plans to release them in a new subscription-based service.

The group also has intelligence gathered by the NSA on foreign banks and ballistic missile programs, it said.

The Shadow Brokers was responsible for leaking EternalBlue, the Windows SMB exploit that was used by attackers in recent days to infect hundreds of thousands of computers around the world with the WannaCry ransomware program.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Will macOS protect you from ransomware attacks?

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 4:06pm

The recent WannaCry ransomware attacks on Windows systems have generated worldwide headlines and caused quite a lot of fear among users of all operating systems. Even some Mac users have been wondering if their computers are safe from such attacks.

[ Related: 8 ways to manage an internet or security crisis ]

So are Mac users safe from ransomware attacks?

A writer at 9to5Mac recently considered the question and warned Mac users not to become complacent despite the fact that Windows is still the #1 target for ransomware attacks.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Google's Chromebooks are getting a night mode to help you sleep better

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 3:52pm

Chrome OS fans on Reddit have uncovered an upcoming “night mode” that changes the color tint of your Chromebook’s display when toggled. The feature is currently called “Night Light” and is only available in Canary, an early build of Chrome OS.

The feature is relatively simple right now, based on user reports. You click on the right corner of the Chrome OS shelf, and when the settings panel comes up you click a Night Light icon close to the power button.

Adding a night mode feature to PC operating systems is something of a trend these days. Prior to this users had to rely on popular third-party options such as f.lux.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Google's Chromebooks are getting a night mode to help you sleep better

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 3:52pm

Chrome OS fans on Reddit have uncovered an upcoming “night mode” that changes the color tint of your Chromebook’s display when toggled. The feature is currently called “Night Light” and is only available in Canary, an early build of Chrome OS.

The feature is relatively simple right now, based on user reports. You click on the right corner of the Chrome OS shelf, and when the settings panel comes up you click a Night Light icon close to the power button.

Adding a night mode feature to PC operating systems is something of a trend these days. Prior to this users had to rely on popular third-party options such as f.lux.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

HPE shows off The Machine prototype without memristors

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

In 2004, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise's Kirk Bresniker set out to make radical changes to computer architecture with The Machine and drew out the first concept design on a whiteboard.

At the time Bresniker, now chief architect at HP Labs, wanted to build a system that could drive computing into the future. The goal was to build a computer that used cutting-edge technologies like memristors and photonics.

It's been an arduous journey, but HPE on Tuesday finally showed a prototype of The Machine at a lab in Fort Collins, Colorado.

It's not close to what the company envisioned with The Machine when it was first announced in 2014 but follows the same principle of pushing computing into memory subsystems. The system breaks the limitations tied to conventional PC and server architecture in which memory is a bottleneck.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Enterprise smartwatch use is catching on

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

Smartwatches are getting a foothold in the enterprise.

In the latest example of a trial, Samsung Galaxy S3 smartwatches are helping janitors do timely cleanups of restrooms at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Another successful four-month Samsung smartwatch trial last fall gave restaurant servers alerts when customers arrived or needed service.

The smartwatches run an app called TaskWatch made by Samsung partner Hipaax. In the airport example, janitors are notified when and where a restroom needs to be cleaned and restocked. Bluetooth sensors at the restroom doorways count the number of users. When 150 customers have passed through a restroom, a notification is sent to the janitorial team.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Funding your startup with the ICO and token crowdsales explosion

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

Investors are allocating substantial sums to cryptocurrencies. Entrepreneurs would be wise to make themselves aware of the billions being raised in the global ICO (initial coin offering) markets.

An ICO is an unregulated means by which a new cryptocurrency venture monetizes its investment. ICOs use dynamic pricing based on real-time supply and demand. The time-based pricing strategy means that no central authority or government sets the price; rather, the price of the token is based on current market demands.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Funding your startup with the ICO and token crowdsales explosion

CIO.com - IT industry - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

Investors are allocating substantial sums to cryptocurrencies. Entrepreneurs would be wise to make themselves aware of the billions being raised in the global ICO (initial coin offering) markets.

An ICO is an unregulated means by which a new cryptocurrency venture monetizes its investment. ICOs use dynamic pricing based on real-time supply and demand. The time-based pricing strategy means that no central authority or government sets the price; rather, the price of the token is based on current market demands.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

HPE shows off The Machine prototype without memristors

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

In 2004, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise's Kirk Bresniker set out to make radical changes to computer architecture with The Machine and drew out the first concept design on a whiteboard.

At the time Bresniker, now chief architect at HP Labs, wanted to build a system that could drive computing into the future. The goal was to build a computer that used cutting-edge technologies like memristors and photonics.

It's been an arduous journey, but HPE on Tuesday finally showed a prototype of The Machine at a lab in Fort Collins, Colorado.

It's not close to what the company envisioned with The Machine when it was first announced in 2014 but follows the same principle of pushing computing into memory subsystems. The system breaks the limitations tied to conventional PC and server architecture in which memory is a bottleneck.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Enterprise smartwatch use is catching on

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 2:00pm

Smartwatches are getting a foothold in the enterprise.

In the latest example of a trial, Samsung Galaxy S3 smartwatches are helping janitors do timely cleanups of restrooms at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Another successful four-month Samsung smartwatch trial last fall gave restaurant servers alerts when customers arrived or needed service.

The smartwatches run an app called TaskWatch made by Samsung partner Hipaax. In the airport example, janitors are notified when and where a restroom needs to be cleaned and restocked. Bluetooth sensors at the restroom doorways count the number of users. When 150 customers have passed through a restroom, a notification is sent to the janitorial team.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

WannaCry: Sometimes you can blame the victims

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 1:46pm

The WannaCry ransomware attack has created at least tens of millions of dollars of damage, taken down hospitals, and as of the time of this writing, another round of attacks is considered imminent as people show up to work after the weekend. Of course, the perpetrators of the malware are to blame for all the damage and suffering that has resulted. It’s not right to blame the victims of a crime, right?

[ Related: 8 ways to manage an internet or security crisis ]

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Missing protection: Corporate B2B privacy policies

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 12:00pm

When most IT execs hear the term “corporate privacy policy,” they think about what their company promises its consumer customers in policies such as those from LinkedInUber and Evernote. But what about policies in contracts entered into with businesses that will handle data from or about your company? Those are rare, and that is a massive security hole.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Facebook hit with maximum fine for breaking French privacy law

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 11:47am

The French data protection watchdog has imposed its harshest penalty on Facebook for six breaches of French privacy law.

The breaches include tracking users across websites other than Facebook.com without their knowledge, and compiling a massive database of personal information in order to target advertising.

The French National Commission on Computing and Liberty (CNIL) began its investigation of Facebook and its European subsidiary, Facebook ireland, after the company made changes to its terms and conditions outlining the practices in January 2015.

CNIL wasn't the only organization concerned by Facebook's changes: data protection authorities in Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Hamburg, Germany also began investigations around the same time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Facebook hit with maximum fine for breaking French privacy law

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 11:47am

The French data protection watchdog has imposed its harshest penalty on Facebook for six breaches of French privacy law.

The breaches include tracking users across websites other than Facebook.com without their knowledge, and compiling a massive database of personal information in order to target advertising.

The French National Commission on Computing and Liberty (CNIL) began its investigation of Facebook and its European subsidiary, Facebook ireland, after the company made changes to its terms and conditions outlining the practices in January 2015.

CNIL wasn't the only organization concerned by Facebook's changes: data protection authorities in Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Hamburg, Germany also began investigations around the same time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How IT leaders can stop the blame game

CIO.com - IT industry - May 16, 2017 - 11:30am

This article is part of a series highlighting key takeaways from my recently published book, Truth From the Trenches: A Practical Guide to the Art of IT ManagementAs a seven-time CIO I’ve had an opportunity to observe the good, the bad and the ugly aspects of IT management up close and personal. Truth From the Trenches is my attempt to share my experiences with emerging IT leaders to help them avoid the chronic problems that afflict so many IT organizations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Smart glasses are making workers more productive

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 11:30am

Everyone loves reading about how to be more productive. Do some digging on the web and you’ll find thousands of pages of articles loaded with actionable tips. Whether it’s waking up two hours early, taking care of emails first, learning how to say no, or becoming better at prioritizing. We’ve all tried to implement ways to make ourselves or our teams more productive at some point in time. But guess what? In 2107, optimizing productivity is becoming more technical.

You don’t need to quit your yoga class, stop setting your alarm early, stop providing breaks at work or remove the ergonomic office furniture. But mixing up more traditional ways of being productive with cutting-edge technology can help optimize every aspect of your business, from supply chain to retail. Let’s take a closer look.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How IT leaders can stop the blame game

CIO.com - Opinion - May 16, 2017 - 11:30am

This article is part of a series highlighting key takeaways from my recently published book, Truth From the Trenches: A Practical Guide to the Art of IT ManagementAs a seven-time CIO I’ve had an opportunity to observe the good, the bad and the ugly aspects of IT management up close and personal. Truth From the Trenches is my attempt to share my experiences with emerging IT leaders to help them avoid the chronic problems that afflict so many IT organizations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Cybercrooks fight over DDoS attack resources

CIO.com - News - May 16, 2017 - 11:30am

As more groups get into the denial-of-service attack business they're starting to get in each other's way, according to a report released this morning.

That translates into a smaller average attack size, said Martin McKeay, senior security advocate at Cambridge, Mass.-based Akamai Technologies Inc.

There are only so many devices around that have the kind of vulnerabilities that make them potential targets for a botnet.

"And other people can come in and take over the device, and take those resources to feed their own botnet," he said. "I'm seeing that over and over."

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

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