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Huawei risk can be managed, say UK cyber-security chiefs

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 12:45pm
UK intelligence chiefs reportedly conclude the Chinese tech giant Huawei can bid for telecoms projects.

Why Some US Cities are Fighting 'Dollar Stores'

Slashdot - February 18, 2019 - 11:15am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

iPhone battery draining fast after installing iOS 12.1.4? Here how to diagnose the problem and get more battery life

ZDnet Blogs - February 18, 2019 - 10:31am
Are you finding that your iPhone's battery life is bad since installing iOS 12.1.4? I'm coming across numerous reports that on social media from users who claim that Apple's latest update for the iPhone an iPad is hammering their battery. Here's what you can do to diagnose the problem and try to get more battery life.
Categories: Opinion

VirtualDJ 2018

ZDnet Blogs - February 18, 2019 - 7:15am
VirtualDJ is a software used by DJs to replace their turntables and CD players, and use digital music instead of vinyl and CDs. It...
Categories: Opinion

Dance Your PhD’s 2018 winner mixes superconductivity and swing dancing

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 4:08am

Cooper pairs and impurities come to life in a superconductor and dance their little particle hearts out in Pramodh Yapa's "Superconductivity: The Musical."

Pairs of swing-dancing electrons do the Lindy Hop in "Superconductivity: The Musical," the winning video for this year's geektastic Dance Your PhD contest. Pramodh Yapa, a graduate student at the University of Alberta, Canada, beat out roughly 50 other entries for the interpretive dance based on his master's thesis, "Non-Local Electrodynamics of Superconducting Wires: Implications for Flux Noise and Inductance."

The Dance Your PhD contest was established in 2008 by science journalist John Bohannon and is sponsored by Science magazine and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Bohannon told Slate in 2011 that he came up with the idea while trying to figure out how to get a group of stressed-out PhD students in the middle of defending their theses to let off a little steam. So he put together a dance party at Austria's Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, including a contest for whichever candidate could best explain their thesis topics with interpretive dance.

Science kicked in a free one-year subscription as a reward. It was such a hit that Bohannon started getting emails asking when the next such contest would be—and Dance Your PhD has continued ever since. There are four broad categories: physics, chemistry, biology, and social science, with a fairly liberal interpretation of what topics fall under each.

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Relative's DNA Solves A 1993 Murder Cold Case

Slashdot - February 18, 2019 - 3:45am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

How we made the effects on Solo: A Star Wars Story

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 2:01am
Visual effects supervisor Julian Foddy explains how they helped make the film.

Facebook needs regulation as Zuckerberg 'fails' - UK MPs

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 1:39am
The House of Commons publishes its report into fake news with some strong criticism of Facebook.

Comic for February 17, 2019

Dilbert - February 18, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Lobbyists Demonize 'Right To Repair' Legislation

Slashdot - February 17, 2019 - 10:15pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Georgia Tech scientists figured out how maggots can eat so much, so fast

Ars Technica - February 17, 2019 - 6:00pm

Enlarge / Studying the collective feeding behavior of black soldier fly larvae. (credit: Hu lab/Georgia Tech)

How do the larvae of black soldier flies eat so much, so fast, despite their tiny size? Scientists at Georgia Tech have been studying this "collective feeding" behavior and found that one strategy for maximizing the larvae's feeding rate involves forming maggot "fountains." The scientists described the results in a recent paper in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, along with an entertaining video showing a swarm of larvae consuming an entire pizza in just two hours.

"This is the first time, as far as I know, that we've really tried to quantify how much they were able to eat, and how they are able to do it," said graduate student and co-author Olga Shishkov, who demonstrated the research on Saturday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, DC. It's not the first time she's had fun demonstrating the maggots' hearty appetite in creative ways: last year, she videotaped the critters devouring a heart-shaped donut for Valentine's Day.

Shishkov's advisor is David Hu, who runs a biolocomotion laboratory at the Georgia Institute of Technology studying how various creatures move. He is perhaps best known for his work with fire ants, but his lab also studies cat tongues, water striders, snakes, various climbing insects, mosquitos, and, of course, black soldier fly larvae.

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