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0 - 200 GB
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Total votes: 45

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Oculus founder sends free repair kits for Rift headsets

BBC Technology News - February 19, 2019 - 2:14pm
Despite leaving Facebook in 2017, Palmer Luckey is shipping his custom repair kit to gamers free of charge.

'No, You Can't Ignore Email. It's Rude.'

Slashdot - February 19, 2019 - 8:15am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Child abuse images being traded via secure apps

BBC Technology News - February 19, 2019 - 6:00am
Stolen credit cards and other illegal material are also on sale, a File on 4 investigation discovers.

Could hackers 'brainjack' your memories in future?

BBC Technology News - February 19, 2019 - 1:03am
A decade from now, memory-boosting implants could be available commercially, but at what risk?

Comic for February 18, 2019

Dilbert - February 19, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Another blow to Blu-ray: Samsung will no longer make Blu-ray players for the US

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 11:37pm

If you didn’t notice any Blu-ray player announcements from Samsung at CES this year, there’s a reason for that: the company has told both Forbes and CNET that it is getting out of the Blu-ray player business in the United States.

The large chaebol conglomerate will introduce no new Blu-ray players anywhere, it seems, and will stop making existing players for the US market. This comes as a confirmation of what many observers expected, given that the company last released a new player in 2017. Samsung was reportedly working on a high-end Blu-ray player for release in 2019, according to Forbes, but those plans have been scrapped.

Samsung didn't tell either publication why it decided to exit the business, and there is probably no big, single reason for this shift. But there are a lot of small ones.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The US cannot crush us, says Huawei founder

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 11:00pm
Ren Zhengfei says the firm will survive despite security concerns and his daughter's legal troubles.

Inside the DNSpionage hacks that hijack domains at an unprecedented scale

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 10:48pm

Enlarge (credit: Lion Kimbro)

Since the beginning of the year, the US government and private security companies have been warning of a sophisticated wave of attacks that’s hijacking domains belonging to multiple governments and private companies at an unprecedented scale. On Monday, a detailed report provided new details that helped explain how and why the widespread DNS hijackings allowed the attackers to siphon huge numbers of email and other login credentials.

The article, published by KrebsOnSecurity reporter Brian Krebs, said that, over the past few months, the attackers behind the so-called DNSpionage campaign have compromised key components of DNS infrastructure for more than 50 Middle Eastern companies and government agencies. Monday’s article goes on to report that the attackers, who are believed to be based in Iran, also took control of domains belonging to two highly influential Western services—the Netnod Internet Exchange in Sweden and the Packet Clearing House in Northern California. With control of the domains, the hackers were able to generate valid TLS certificates that allowed them to launch man-in-the-middle attacks that intercepted sensitive credentials and other data.

Short for domain name system, DNS acts as one of the Internet’s most fundamental services by translating human-readable domain names into the IP addresses one computer needs to locate other computers over the global network. DNS hijacking works by falsifying the DNS records to cause a domain to point to an IP address controlled by a hacker rather than the domain’s rightful owner. DNSpionage has taken DNS hijacking to new heights, in large part by compromising key services that companies and governments rely on to provide domain lookups for their sites and email servers.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Windows 7 users: You need SHA-2 support or no Windows updates after July 2019

ZDnet Blogs - February 18, 2019 - 10:04pm
Microsoft will begin rolling out SHA-2 standalone updates for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 in March in preparation for its July 16 implementation deadline.
Categories: Opinion

The wrath of grapes: A tale of 12 dead microwaves and plasma-spewing grapes

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 10:00pm

Enlarge / Not just for grapes: plasma formed between a pair of hydrogel beads irradiated in a household microwave oven. (credit: Hamza K. Khattak)

DIY science enthusiasts know that, if you put a halved grape into a microwave with just a bit of skin connecting the halves, it'll produce sparks and a fiery plume of ionized gas known as a plasma. There are thousands of YouTube videos documenting the effect. But the standard explanation offered for why this occurs isn't quite right, according to a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And its authors only needed to destroy a dozen microwaves to prove it.

"Many microwaves were in fact harmed during the experiments," admitted co-author Hamza Khattak of Trent University in Canada. "At one point, we had a microwave graveyard in the lab before disposing of the many early iterations in electronic waste."

Co-author Aaron Slepkov first became interested in the phenomenon when, as an undergraduate in 1995, he noticed there was no formal (i.e., scientifically rigorous and peer-reviewed) explanation for how the plasma was being generated. Once he'd finished his PhD and established his own research group at Trent University, he started doing his own experiments (microwaving grapes for science) with one of his undergraduate students. They used thermal imaging and computer simulations of both grapes and hydrogel beads in their experiments.

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Niantic poised to settle Pokémon Go trespassing complaints

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 9:15pm

Enlarge (credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

A proposed settlement filed last week could give homeowners some control over whether or not Pokémon Go's augmented-reality attractions show up in and around their property.

Shortly after its launch in the summer of 2016, Pokémon Go developer Niantic started fielding numerous complaints about players trespassing on private property to access location-dependent Gyms and Pokéstops in the augmented-reality game. Those complaints eventually developed into numerous lawsuits alleging that Niantic was essentially encouraging trespassing by placing its digital attractions on their property.

Those lawsuits were consolidated into a class action by August, and after winding through the courts for years (and surviving a motion to dismiss), that class-action suit now seems on the verge of a settlement. A proposal filed by the plaintiffs in district court last week (as noted by The Hollywood Reporter) outlines a number of ways Niantic apparently plans to solve this problem.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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