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YouTube backtracks after Pokemon 'child abuse' ban

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 5:39pm
Google backtracks after "mistakenly" deleting YouTubers for "sexual content involving minors".

A 5km asteroid may briefly occult the brightest star in the night sky

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 4:38pm

Enlarge / An artist's impression showing the binary star system of Sirius A and its diminutive blue companion, Sirius B. (credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon)

Sirius, a binary system, is the brightest star in the night sky. The larger of the two stars, Sirius A, is about 25 times more luminous than the Sun, and Sirius is relatively nearby, at less than 9 light years from our Solar System.

On Monday night, for a few areas of South and Central America, as well as the Caribbean, Sirius will probably briefly disappear. This will occur as a small asteroid passes in front of the star, occulting it for up to 1.6 seconds, according to the International Occultation Timing Association. (Yes, the acronym is IOTA).

In this case, the asteroid 4388 Jürgenstock will have an apparent diameter just an iota bigger than Sirius. The angular diameter of the asteroid is about 0.007 arcseconds (an arcsecond is 1/3,600th of a degree of the night sky), whereas the angular diameter of Sirius is 0.006 arcseconds. Thus, as the asteroid passes in front of Sirius, the star will briefly dim, perhaps completely, before quickly brightening again. Sirius may appear to blink once, slowly.

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HP Elitebook x360 1040 G5 review: A little bit bigger, a little bit better

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 4:08pm

Enlarge / Wow, many book, so elite. (credit: Valentina Palladino)

The battle of the business notebooks is in full swing as HP tries to one-up Lenovo—and itself—all in one go. HP scored a winner with an updated 13-inch Elitebook x360 it released last year. Now it's full-speed ahead with the new Elitebook x360 1040 G5, the newest version of HP's 14-inch business notebook. The 13-inch model is smaller and lighter overall, but HP offers upgraded features in this larger convertible and promises a 14-inch display in a 13-inch chassis.

We liked the 13-inch Elitebook x360, so I was looking to answer a few questions in testing the Elitebook x360 1040: Does it succeed in all the ways its 13-inch counterpart did? Is it better than the smaller option? And did HP create a device that can dethrone Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 laptops and convertibles as the kings of commercial ultrabooks? Let's find out.

Look and feel

HP is pushing the fact that the Elitebook x360 1040 fits a 14-inch screen in a 13-inch chassis. That's impressive, but it also means that the company didn't change much about the convertible's external design. The same brushed aluminum coloring covers the entire laptop, accented only by diamond-cut edges that appear shiny and sharp when they catch the light. The metal hinges have a slightly curved, rectangular shape to them, allowing the screen to swivel 360 degrees from laptop to tent to tablet mode.

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Dealmaster: All the best Presidents’ Day tech deals we can find

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 3:58pm

Enlarge / Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon is on sale for Presidents' Day. (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Greetings, Arsians! The Dealmaster is back with another holiday deals roundup. This time we're coming at you with a wide range of Presidents' Day sales, because George Washington was definitely thinking of what 4K TV deals he could score as he was crossing the Delaware.

Kidding. But Presidents' Day—or Washington's Birthday, which, fun fact, does not occur on Washington's actual birthday—has, like most holidays, become an excuse for retailers to push discounts on all sorts of items in their inventory. Many of these deals apply to things like home goods, clothing, and mattresses, but tech is fairly well represented, too.

Per usual, a lot of these sales are junk, but the Dealmaster has rounded up a sampling of the worthwhile tech deals currently available around the Web. Our list includes discounts on Amazon and Apple devices, 4K Roku TVs, big-name video games like Red Dead Redemption 2 and Marvel's Spider-Man, Lenovo ThinkPads, a sitewide 15% off coupon at Rakuten, and much more. Have a look for yourself below.

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The Complicated Economy of Open Source Software

Slashdot - February 18, 2019 - 3:45pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

The mythos and meaning behind Pokémon’s most famous glitch

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 2:00pm

Enlarge / Being the result of a glitch doesn't make MissingNo any less real to players—or researchers. (credit: Nintendo / Wilma Bainbridge)

Warning: This article contains references to the plot of Pokémon: Red and Blue and the more recent (but related to the topic here) game, Doki Doki Literature Club.

In my flowery ring binder of Pokémon Red and Blue cheats, there was one set of instructions that spoke to my eight-year-old self most of all. I'd heard from friends (and many, many GeoCities pages) that 'the MissingNo cheat' could destroy your game—but it could also get you unlimited Rare Candy. This seemed like a fair trade to me.

The first Pokémon games for the Game Boy included 151 Pokémon (including the ultra-rare Mew, if your parents were long-suffering enough to drive you to one of the Nintendo promo events where it was distributed). But by following a seemingly random series of steps, players could encounter a 152nd Pokémon, MissingNo (Missing Number), which took the form of an L-shaped block of pixels.

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Liveblog: The Samsung Galaxy S10 launch happens Wednesday, February 20

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 1:43pm

Enlarge (credit: Samsung)

Samsung Unpacked 2019 will kick off Wednesday, February 20, at 11am Pacific (2pm ET) in San Francisco. We're going to hear all about Samsung's Flagship lineup for 2019, which includes the Galaxy S10 in many variants.

We already have a huge post here outlining what to expect, but the highlight of the event will be the Galaxy S10 and S10 Plus. These devices are expected to bring a number of advancements to mainstream smartphones. They will be one of the first device families to feature the Snapdragon 855 SoC, Wi-Fi 6, and an ultrasonic in-screen fingerprint sensor. There's also a slick new "hole punch" camera cutout in the display, along with slim bezels, which means the displays are getting even bigger.

We're also getting way more than just the S10 and S10 Plus. There's expected to be a cheaper version of the Galaxy S10 called the "Galaxy S10e," and we might get a look at the upcoming 5G version. Samsung has also spent some time teasing that "The future of mobile will unfold" at the event, which means we'll hear a bit more about the company's upcoming foldable smartphone (the Galaxy F?).

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YouTube aids flat earth conspiracy theorists, research suggests

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 1:38pm
The ranks of people who believe the Earth is flat are being helped by YouTube, suggests a US study.

Australian political parties hit by 'state actor' hack, PM says

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 1:02pm
The "sophisticated" activity follows an intrusion on parliamentary servers, PM Scott Morrison says.

Pulwama attack: Google searches 'hijacked' to link Pakistan flag to toilet paper

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 12:48pm
The results are believed to be the work of Indian protesters responding to the 14 February Kashmir attack.

Huawei risk can be managed, say UK cyber-security chiefs

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 12:45pm
UK intelligence chiefs reportedly conclude the Chinese tech giant Huawei can bid for telecoms projects.

Why Some US Cities are Fighting 'Dollar Stores'

Slashdot - February 18, 2019 - 11:15am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

VirtualDJ 2018

ZDnet Blogs - February 18, 2019 - 7:15am
VirtualDJ is a software used by DJs to replace their turntables and CD players, and use digital music instead of vinyl and CDs. It...
Categories: Opinion

Dance Your PhD’s 2018 winner mixes superconductivity and swing dancing

Ars Technica - February 18, 2019 - 4:08am

Cooper pairs and impurities come to life in a superconductor and dance their little particle hearts out in Pramodh Yapa's "Superconductivity: The Musical."

Pairs of swing-dancing electrons do the Lindy Hop in "Superconductivity: The Musical," the winning video for this year's geektastic Dance Your PhD contest. Pramodh Yapa, a graduate student at the University of Alberta, Canada, beat out roughly 50 other entries for the interpretive dance based on his master's thesis, "Non-Local Electrodynamics of Superconducting Wires: Implications for Flux Noise and Inductance."

The Dance Your PhD contest was established in 2008 by science journalist John Bohannon and is sponsored by Science magazine and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Bohannon told Slate in 2011 that he came up with the idea while trying to figure out how to get a group of stressed-out PhD students in the middle of defending their theses to let off a little steam. So he put together a dance party at Austria's Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, including a contest for whichever candidate could best explain their thesis topics with interpretive dance.

Science kicked in a free one-year subscription as a reward. It was such a hit that Bohannon started getting emails asking when the next such contest would be—and Dance Your PhD has continued ever since. There are four broad categories: physics, chemistry, biology, and social science, with a fairly liberal interpretation of what topics fall under each.

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Relative's DNA Solves A 1993 Murder Cold Case

Slashdot - February 18, 2019 - 3:45am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

How we made the effects on Solo: A Star Wars Story

BBC Technology News - February 18, 2019 - 2:01am
Visual effects supervisor Julian Foddy explains how they helped make the film.

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