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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
27%
500 - 800 GB
2%
800 - 1200 GB
10%
1200 - 1500 GB
10%
1500 - 2000 GB
15%
> 2000 GB
20%
Total votes: 41

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Facebook is adding petitions to your news feed - CNET

cNET.com - News - 13 hours 15 min ago
"Community Actions" will start rolling out to users in the US on Monday.

Windows 7 versus Windows 10: Here comes the final showdown

ZDnet Blogs - 13 hours 19 min ago
With less than a year to a major Windows 7 support deadline, it’s decision time for the PC.
Categories: Opinion

9 great reads from CNET this week - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 20, 2019 - 10:17pm
We learned how Facebook is still key to the pet rescue world, stepped out in Nike's new self-lacing sneakers and took a ride on the most high-tech chairlift.

Shazam superhero movie with Zachary Levi: Release date, trailers, cast - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 20, 2019 - 9:29pm
Here's our ongoing guide to the upcoming DC Comics film starring Zachary Levi.

Old Gods and New Gods prepare for war in new trailer for American Gods S2

Ars Technica - January 20, 2019 - 8:00pm

Second trailer for American Gods season 2, which debuts on Starz March 10.

We're less than two months away from the season 2 debut of American Gods, the TV adaptation of Neil Gaiman's 2001 novel, and Starz has rewarded fans' patience with a shiny new trailer.

(Spoilers for first season below.)

In season 1, Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle), a recently released convict, falls in with the mysterious Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) as his bodyguard, after losing his wife, Laura (Emily Browning). But Mr. Wednesday is not who he seems. He's actually the ancient Norse god Odin seeking to rally all the remaining Old Gods, who are slowly dying off from people's lack of belief. Their mission: beat back the encroaching influence of all the New Gods so they can survive.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The best stuff you can get for under $30 - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 20, 2019 - 6:13pm
Have some spare gift cards? Just looking to treat yourself? Here are some great ideas that won't break the bank.

DNC says Russian hackers hit it with phishing effort after midterms - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 20, 2019 - 6:07pm
The Democratic National Committee apparently hasn't lost its allure for Russia-linked hacking groups like Cozy Bear.

SNL pits Trump against Congress on Deal or No Deal: Shutdown Edition - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 20, 2019 - 5:42pm
Maybe the president's game show past will let him end the shutdown this way.

Dear humans, We thought it was time we looked through YOUR source code. We found a mystery ancestor. Signed, the computers

The Register - January 20, 2019 - 5:07pm
Well, computers programmed by AI-wielding bio-boffins

The human genome is hiding secrets that point to a mystery ancestor alongside our hominid cousins the Neanderthals and Denisovans, according to AI software.…

Intrepid scientist corrects physiology in Gulliver’s Travels after 300 years

Ars Technica - January 20, 2019 - 5:00pm

Enlarge / Title page of first edition of Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, relating the fictional adventures of one Lemuel Gulliver. (credit: Meisei University Library, Tokyo, Japan)

Gulliver's Travels is justly regarded as one of the best satirical novels of all time, although its author, Jonathan Swift, claimed he wrote the book "to vex the world rather than divert it." Politicians of the time were indeed vexed at being mocked in its pages. It seems the author's physiological descriptions also proved a bit vexatious, according to a charming new paper in the Journal of Physiological Sciences.

First published in 1726, Gulliver's Travels relates the fictional adventures of one Lemuel Gulliver, "first a surgeon and then a captain of several ships," according to the book's lengthy subtitle. During his voyages, Gulliver encounters several unusual species: the tiny people of Lilliput, the giants of Brobdingnag, talking horses called Houyhnhnms who rule over the deformed, uncouth Yahoos, and the inhabitants of the flying island of Laputa, who devote themselves to the study of science and the arts but have never figured out how to apply that knowledge for practical applications. Apart from its literary qualities, Gulliver's Travels provided ample fodder for eagle-eyed experts, since Swift couldn't resist going into great detail about the physiology of his fictional species, practically inviting closer scrutiny.

Toshio Kuroki, special advisor to the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo and Gifu University, read Gulliver's Travels for the first time with his book club. Having spent a long, prestigious career conducting cancer research, Kuroki immediately noticed an error on Swift's part when estimating Gulliver's energy requirements compared to that of the diminutive Lilliputions. It spurred him to look more closely at similar passages in the book, and to make his own comparative physiological analysis of the fictional creatures encountered by Gulliver during his travels.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Is Disney's Star Wars Franchise In Trouble?

Slashdot - January 20, 2019 - 4:45pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Why Silicon Valley’s “growth at any cost” is the new “unsafe at any speed”

Ars Technica - January 20, 2019 - 4:30pm

(video link)

If there's one person outside of government who has stood against Facebook's crashing wave, it's Ashkan Soltani.

Late last year, the independent privacy researcher was suddenly called to speak before the UK Parliament about Facebook's privacy practices, simply because he happened to be in London and, in his own words, "was just a dick on Twitter."

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Western Digital’s Black SSD is now focused on gaming, can come with a heatsink

Ars Technica - January 20, 2019 - 4:00pm

Western Digital has begun shipping the WD Black SN750, the latest in its popular Black line of performance-oriented, solid-state hard drives. The company is also pivoting the Black brand to be primarily focused on gamers; this is part of an ongoing trend that high-end PC hardware is getting categorized as gamer gear.

Western Digital claims the newest entry will offer an option to help PC gamers reduce risk of throttling-related performance dips. That's thanks to an optional heatsink add-on, but the company also credits improved performance to firmware refinements. Other than that, the WD Black SN750 is a modest update over its predecessor. Anandtech benchmarked it and saw some performance improvements over the previous drive, but nothing dramatic—and what improvements were there were largely thanks to the firmware.

The SN750 still uses the same 64-layer 3D NAND we've seen before, while some competitors are introducing 96-layer 3D NAND products. Nevertheless, the SN750 remains an attractive option for performance-minded gamers because of its power efficiency, because of its more-than-good-enough performance, and because the prices are more attractive than they once were.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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