Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
19%
200 - 500 GB
30%
500 - 800 GB
4%
800 - 1200 GB
7%
1200 - 1500 GB
7%
1500 - 2000 GB
11%
> 2000 GB
22%
Total votes: 54

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

'Cancel Brexit' petition passes 2m signatures on Parliament site

BBC Technology News - March 21, 2019 - 11:50pm
A call to revoke Article 50 generates the fastest ever rate of signatures on Parliament's website.

Facebook apps logged users’ passwords in plaintext, because why not

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 10:39pm

Enlarge / Facebook Lite users made up the majority of Facebook accounts exposed internally by plaintext password logging, according to a Facebook spokesperson.

Facebook has mined a lot of data about its users over the years—relationships, political leanings, and even phone call logs. And now it appears Facebook may have inadvertently extracted another bit of critical information: users' login credentials, stored unencrypted on Facebook's servers and accessible to Facebook employees.

Brian Krebs reports that hundreds of millions of Facebook users had their credentials logged in plain text by various applications written by Facebook employees. Those credentials were searched by about 2,000 Facebook engineers and developers more than 9 million times, according to a senior Facebook employee who spoke to Krebs; the employee asked to remain anonymous because they did not have permission to speak to the press on the matter.

In a blog post today, Facebook Vice President of Engineering, Security, and Privacy Pedro Canahuati wrote that the unencrypted passwords were found during "a routine security review in January" on Facebook's internal network data storage. "This caught our attention because our login systems are designed to mask passwords using techniques that make them unreadable. We have fixed these issues and, as a precaution, we will be notifying everyone whose passwords we have found were stored in this way."

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Why “chickenpox parties” are a terrible idea—in case it’s not obvious

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 10:25pm

Enlarge / A child with chicken pox. (credit: Getty Images | Dave Thompson)

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin made headlines Tuesday after revealing in a radio interview that he had purposefully exposed his nine unvaccinated children to chickenpox, drawing swift condemnation from health experts.

In case anyone needs a refresher on why you shouldn’t deprive children of safe, potentially lifesaving vaccines or purposefully expose them to serious, potentially life-threatening infections, here’s a quick rundown.

Chickenpox is nothing to mess with

Though most children who get the itchy, highly contagious viral disease go on to recover after a week or so of misery, chickenpox can cause severe complications and even death in some. Complications include nasty skin infections, pneumonia, brain inflammation, hemorrhaging, blood stream infections, and dehydration.

Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Critical flaw lets hackers control lifesaving devices implanted inside patients

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 9:25pm

Enlarge / An X-ray showing an cardio defibrillator implanted in a patient. (credit: Sunzi99~commonswiki)

The federal government on Thursday warned of a serious flaw in Medtronic cardio defibrillators that allows attackers to use radio communications to surreptitiously take full control of the lifesaving devices after they are implanted in a patient.

Defibrillators are small, surgically implanted devices that deliver electrical shocks to treat potentially fatal irregular heart rhythms. In recent decades, doctors have increasingly used radios to monitor and adjust the devices once they're implanted rather than using older, costlier, and more invasive means. An array of implanted cardio defibrillators made by Medtronic rely on two types of radio-based consoles for initial setup, periodic maintenance, and regular monitoring. Doctors use the company's CareLink Programmer in clinics, while patients use the MyCareLink Monitor in homes to regularly ensure the defibrillators are working properly.

No encryption, no authentication, and a raft of other flaws

Researchers from security firm Clever Security discovered that the Conexus Radio Frequency Telemetry Protocol (Medtronic's proprietary means for the monitors to wirelessly connect to implanted devices) provides no encryption to secure communications. That makes it possible for attackers within radio range to eavesdrop on the communications. Even worse, the protocol has no means of authentication for legitimate devices to prove they are authorized to take control of the implanted devices. That lack of authentication, combined with a raft of other vulnerabilities, makes it possible for attackers within radio range to completely rewrite the defibrillator firmware, which is rarely seen in exploits that affect medical device vulnerabilities.

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

They didn’t buy the DLC: feature that could’ve prevented 737 crashes was sold as an option

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 8:59pm

Enlarge (credit: Marian Lockhart / Boeing)

The crashed Lion Air 737 MAX and the Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX aircraft had more in common than aircraft design and the apparently malfunctioning flight system that led to their demises. Both of the planes lacked optional safety features that would have alerted the pilots to problems with their angle of attack (AOA) sensors—the input suspected of causing the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) software to put both aircraft into a fatal dive.

The New York Times reports that both vehicles lacked an "AOA disagree" light—a warning light that indicates when the aircraft's two AOA sensors provide different readings—and an angle of attack indicator. Since the MCAS system relied only on one of the aircraft's AOA sensors, the disagree light and AOA indicator would have given the flight crew visible evidence of a sensor failure and prompted them to disable the MCAS. But both of these features were sold by Boeing as expensive add-ons. And many discount and smaller airlines declined to purchase them, as they were not required by regulators.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Dealmaster: Get a 256GB Samsung microSD card for $40

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 7:49pm

Enlarge (credit: TechBargains)

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. Today's list is highlighted by a deal on the 256GB variant of Samsung's EVO Select microSD card. It's down to $40 on Amazon, which is a new low and about $10-15 off its usual price.

We've highlighted this card a few times in the past, so we won't dwell on the specifics here. In short, while it's not the absolute fastest of its kind and it's not as good for security cams as a dedicated high-endurance card, it should still be plenty powerful enough to boost the storage space of a Nintendo Switch, smartphone, or GoPro. It also comes with a 10-year warranty. More importantly, it's good value for a reliable card with this much storage at this price.

If you don't need more storage, though, we also have deals on HDMI cables, Kingdom Hearts III, PlayStation Plus subscriptions, and much more. Have a look for yourself below.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

A dev trained robots to generate “garbage” slot machine games—and made $50K

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 7:35pm

Enlarge / Two indie devs explain how they used automation, a single Google Play account, and a single slot-machine template to create and distribute over 1,000 slot machine apps. (credit: Alex Schwarz)

SAN FRANCISCO—This year's Game Developers Conference saw two game makers emerge with a possible chapter in a future dystopian sci-fi novel: the story of making money by letting robots do the work. In their case, that work was the procedural generation of smartphone games.

A single "game jam" event led to a data machine that ultimately pumped out a decent amount of cash: $50,000 over a couple of years. Years later, with that data (and money) in hand, the makers of this game-making machine, which focused entirely on "garbage" free-to-play slot machines, used GDC as a wake-up call to an industry where the "right" messages often revolve around listening to players, sidling up to publishers, and racking up critical acclaim. In their case, eschewing all of that worked a little too well for their comfort level.

Winning the “race to the bottom”

In 2013, two video game makers had been trying for years to make it in the burgeoning mobile games space. One of them, Alex Schwartz, had helped get the solid mobile swiping-action game Jack Lumber off the ground. (In a past life, I gave that game a good review at the now defunct tablet-only magazine The Daily.) The other, Ziba Scott, had put together a fine mobile-friendly puzzle game, Girls Like Robots.

Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Millions of Facebook passwords exposed internally

BBC Technology News - March 21, 2019 - 7:30pm
Developers working for Facebook logged the passwords in plain text as they wrote code for the site.

Latest trailer for John Wick 3: Parabellum is sheer guns-and-glory mayhem

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 7:23pm

Keanu Reeves gives us a Matrix callback in latest John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum trailer.

Fresh on the heels of the announcement that Bill and Ted 3: Face the Music will start shooting this summer, we get a new trailer for another Keanu Reeves-starring vehicle: John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum.

(Spoilers for first two films below.)

For those who missed the first two movies, John Wick (Reeves) is a legendary hitman (known as "Baba Yaga") who tried to retire when he fell in love and got married. Unfortunately, he's drawn back into the dark underground world by an act of senseless violence after his wife's death. Nothing will stop John Wick from seeking retribution. The first John Wick grossed more than $88 million worldwide for a film that cost around $30 million to make, and it was praised for its brisk pace, heart-stopping action sequences, and stylish noir feel.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Half the species in a new Cambrian fossil site are completely new to us

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 7:00pm

Enlarge / The level of detail in some of the fossils is astonishing. (credit: Dongjing Fu et. al.)

The first signs of complex animal life begin in the Ediacaran Period, which started more than 600 million years ago. But it's difficult to understand how those organisms relate to the life we see around us today. Part of this issue is that those fossils are rare, as many rocks of that period appear to have been wiped off the Earth by a globe-spanning glaciation. But another problem is that the organisms we do see from this period aren't clearly related to anything that came after them.

With the arrival of the Cambrian Period about 550 million years ago, all of that changed. In fossil beds like the famed Burgess Shale, we can see organisms that clearly have features of the major groups of life that have persisted to this day. As more collections of fossils become available, we can even watch groups diversify as the Cambrian progressed. But there's still considerable debate over whether these changes represent a true, multi-million-year "explosion" and what environmental changes might have driven this diversification.

We may be on the verge of some big help in answering these questions, as scientists are announcing the discovery of a spectacular deposit of Cambrian fossils from South China. The fossils include dozens of species, half of which we've never seen before, and appear to represent a previously upsampled ecological zone. The preservation is such that soft-bodied creatures like jellyfish, and the softer body parts of creatures with shells, can easily be made out in the rocks. Best yet, the researchers who uncovered the samples suggest that rocks from the same formation are widespread in China.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

US nuclear is dying, but it produced more electricity in 2018 than ever before

Ars Technica - March 21, 2019 - 6:55pm

(credit: Photograph by tva.com)

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US nuclear fleet produced more electrical energy than ever before in 2018. Last year, it produced 807.1 terawatt-hours (TWh) of electricity, barely beating its 2010 peak of 807TWh. But the US nuclear industry has been in a well-documented decline. So what gives?

(credit: Energy Information Administration)

The EIA says the explanation comes from a combination of scheduling serendipity and what's called "uprating," where older nuclear plants are permitted to output more power. In a post this morning, the administration wrote that we shouldn't expect this much nuclear power output from the industry again—at least not in the near future.

Since the last peak in 2010, more than 5 gigawatts (GW) of nuclear capacity has been retired. Some of that was offset by a new reactor addition: another 1.2GW of capacity came online in 2016 at TVA's Watts-Barr nuclear plant when reactor 2 was completed.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Arrests shut down illegal TV streaming gang

BBC Technology News - March 21, 2019 - 6:49pm
The gang behind the net TV services offered access to hundreds of channels in 30 countries.

Huawei ban would delay 5G rollout: Three

BBC Technology News - March 21, 2019 - 6:34pm
The boss of mobile operator Three said he was confident the Chinese firm was not a threat to customers.

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:49.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com