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Quirky sci-fi farce Mega Time Squad sends up all those time-travel tropes

Ars Technica - 5 hours 39 min ago

Enlarge / Seeing double: John (Anton Tennett) steals a magic bracelet from a Chinese antiques store that gives him the ability to go back in time in Mega Time Squad. (credit: Vimeo/Tim van Dammen)

A magic bracelet doubles as a time-traveling device for a down-on-his-luck small-time criminal in the 2018 New Zealand sci-fi comedy Mega Time Squad. A favorite of the festival circuit, this quirky twist on the time travel genre is finally available in select theaters and on VOD in the United States.

(Mild spoilers below.)

Written and directed by Tim van Dammen, the 90-minute film had screenings last year at the Fantasia International Film Festival and the New Zealand International Film Festival (NZIFF), earning praise for its sharp, slangy dialogue and clever twist on standard time-travel tropes. Tone-wise, it's roughly in the same vein as Taika Waititi's delightful Hunt for the Wilderpeople and What We Do in the Shadows or the 2012 American Sundance favorite Safety Not Guaranteed. In other words, it's an odd, understated, delightful farce, with a touch of sweetness offsetting the zany antics and broad humor.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Electric truck startup announces $700 million funding round led by Amazon

Ars Technica - 6 hours 38 min ago

Enlarge / A marketing photo of Rivian's R1T electric pickup truck. (credit: Rivian)

On Friday, electric truck startup Rivian announced a $700 million funding round led by Amazon. The announcement is notable not just for the size of the investment but also due to Amazon's involvement.

The e-commerce giant has made a variety of investments in mobility, and electric trucks and SUVs like the kind Rivian debuted at the Los Angeles Auto Show in November could help the company further its ambitions in that regard.

Rivian's R1T pickup and R1S SUV made a splash at their announcement. The startup is seen as a potential competitor to Tesla, which has promised to develop an all-electric pickup truck in the future. Rivian's trucks are expected to be pricy: the startup is taking pre-orders, and it said in November that, when the R1T and R1S go on sale in late 2020, they'll start at $61,500, and $65,000 after the $7,500 IRS tax credit. (Rivian has sold no trucks to date, so vehicles from that company would still be eligible for the full electric vehicle tax credit. The full tax credit begins to phase out after a company has sold more than 200,000 electric vehicles.)

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Quadriga: The cryptocurrency exchange that lost $135m

BBC Technology News - 20 hours 57 min ago
When Quadriga's founder died he left behind a mystery: what happened to millions in cryptocurrency?

Comic for February 16, 2019

Dilbert - 21 hours 39 min ago
Categories: Geek

Welcome to the cyber world: The real-world tech behind Alita: Battle Angel

Ars Technica - February 16, 2019 - 9:05pm

Enlarge / The futuristic cyborg world depicted in Alita: Battle Angel has some promising real-world analogues. (credit: 20th Century Fox)

The CGI-heavy cinematic world of Alita: Battle Angel, the big-screen adaptation of Yukito Kishiro's popular manga series Gunnm, is chock-full of the kinds of cyberpunk toys most of us only dream about. But while much of the technology in Alita is futuristic, it's deliberately grounded in the real-world technology of today, per producer James Cameron's vision for the film.

(Mildest of spoilers for Alita: Battle Angel below. You can read Sam Machkovech's largely spoiler-free review here.)

Set some 600 years in the future, the cyberpunk world of Alita: Battle Angel is a dystopian society where people in Iron City scavenge for anything useful—especially technology—in the Scrapyard, which holds everything dumped from the floating city of Zalem, where the "elite" reside. There's a series of tubes where products are sent from the Iron City to Zalem (in exchange for the latter's refuse), but otherwise the two worlds never really mix. The Scrapyard is where a kind doctor finds cyborg Alita's head, holding her carefully preserved human brain. He knows immediately he's looking at highly advanced technology from three centuries earlier, lost in time, and rehabilitates her. The plot follows her journey from amnesiac innocent to fierce warrior.

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