Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News > RSS Newsfeeds > Sources

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Google search


Poll
For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
38%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
38%
Manual into existing VRC
5%
Manual into new VRC
19%
Total votes: 42

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
Ars Technica
Syndicate content Ars Technica
Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis.
Updated: 39 min 59 sec ago

White House reportedly exploring wartime rule to help coal, nuclear

5 hours 24 min ago

(credit: Kym Farnik)

According to reports from Bloomberg and E&E News, the Trump Administration has been exploring another way to help coal and nuclear generators: the Defense Production Act of 1950.

The Act was passed under President Truman. Motivated by the Korean War, it allows the president broad authority to boost US industries that are considered a priority for national security. On Thursday, E&E News cited sources that said "an interagency process is underway" at the White House to examine possible application of the act to the energy industry. The goal would be to give some form of preference to coal and nuclear plants that are struggling to compete with cheap natural gas.

Third time's the charm?

This appears to be the third attempt to use policy to keep coal and nuclear operators afloat. The main focus is coal generators, which Trump promised to rescue during his campaign. Although Trump's campaign rhetoric often blamed environmental regulations, the problem has been economic more than regulatory; cheap natural gas has been the biggest threat to coal and nuclear.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Review: Subaru Crosstrek finds sweet spot between value and drivability

6 hours 24 min ago

Subaru

In a world where seemingly every auto manufacturer is making SUVs (hello, Lamborghini!) and crossovers, it can be hard to stand out from the crowd. Alfa Romeo does it by making an insanely fast and sporty crossover. Range Rover goes for an incredibly sleek look and a separate screen just for climate control. By contrast, Subaru just tries to make quality vehicles. That strategy has served the company well with the Outback, which has been at or near the top of the station wagon sales charts for what seems like forever. But can that strategy work with crossovers? Enter the Crosstrek.

All new for the 2018 model year, the Subaru Crosstrek is a mini crossover built on Subaru's new Global Platform, which Subaru says offers 70-percent more rigidity. The Crosstrek has a raised suspension with Stablex dampers for a smoother ride. The old, familiar Subaru Boxer engine remains—in this case the usual 2.0-liter, direct-injection, four-cylinder suspect capable of cranking out 152hp (113.3kW) and 145lb-ft of torque (196.6nM); if you're thinking that sounds a bit light, keep reading. The all-wheel drive Crosstrek has a seven-speed Lineartronic CVT transmission, but Subaru offers a six-speed manual transmission in the base and Premium trims. If automatic transmission is your thing but you like to take over sometimes, the Crosstrek comes with paddle shifters.

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Super Troopers 2 review: Fans get what they paid for in this crowdfunded surprise

8 hours 9 min ago

The Internet hype campaign for Super Troopers 2 sneaked in at the tail end of the crowdfunding gold rush in 2015, and that timing might have made all the difference. Crowdfunding fatigue is alive and well, after all, with the practice significantly dropping off since its mid-'10s heyday. Who knows if the Broken Lizard comedy troupe would have raised over $4.6 million if they'd launched the effort even half a year later?

What, then, did fans help create by way of an Indiegogo campaign? Exactly what Broken Lizard promised: "the version of Super Troopers 2 you've been waiting for." Consider that a blessing or a curse, depending on your comedy point of view, but there's just no getting around how spiritually faithful this sequel is to the silly-cops original. More important, however, is that this crowdfunded film does not bend to the simplest catchphrase and old-gag doldrums you might expect. Just because Broken Lizard took fans' money doesn't mean the comics were stuck repeating material from the 2001 film.

The result is an easy call for best crowdfunded film in recent memory. That's a low bar to clear, of course, and Super Troopers 2 is by no means a perfect film. But its ingeniously orchestrated stupidity—like a Jackson Pollack painting made up of cop pranks and hard-R visual gags—is must-see stuff for anybody who liked the first film.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

WikiLeaks, Russia, Trump Jr. named in new DNC hacking lawsuit

20 hours 18 min ago

Enlarge / Tom Perez, the head of the DNC, helped orchestrate this new lawsuit. (credit: Gage Skidmore)

The Democratic National Committee has sued Russia, WikiLeaks, the Trump campaign, and a number of other individuals and organizations that the political party believes were affiliated with the now-infamous 2016 hack, whose perpetrators managed to spirit away internal research about then-candidate Donald Trump, as well as private e-mail and messages.

The operation to pilfer vast caches of data, much of which was then published by WikiLeaks, was believed to have been orchestrated by the highest levels of the Russian government.

"It’s pretty serious—it’s more than a shot over the bow, it’s a shot into the hull of the ship," David Bowker, a Washington DC, attorney, told Ars.

Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Capcom reminds us why “games-as-a-service” suck, announces end of Puzzle Fighter

April 20, 2018 - 9:30pm

Enlarge / RIP Puzzle Fighter, 2017-2018. (credit: Capcom)

The games-as-a-service graveyard grew one larger this week, as Capcom's Puzzle Fighter reboot received an official "sunset" announcement on Friday. The iOS and Android port of the '90s puzzle series will have its in-game store shut down on Monday, April 23, and its servers will follow suit on July 31—meaning the game will have been playable for only eight months after its late-November launch.

That's because the new, free-to-play Puzzle Fighter includes an always-online requirement so that players can be subjected to the timers and loot-box systems applied to both its single-player and multiplayer modes. Capcom's announcement did not in any way hint to a patch that would let the game work in a wholly offline mode, nor did it hint to any open-sourcing of its content so that dedicated players could, say, prop the game's bones up via DIY servers.

Friday's announcement also didn't reference the fact that this game's reboot recently received PEGI ratings (Europe's equivalent of the ESRB) for PC and consoles. And the language here doesn't give us much hope for a non-mobile port of the Columns-like, match-gems puzzle update. Instead, the post blames the mobile version's cancellation on Capcom Vancouver "dedicating its focus to our flagship Dead Rising franchise."

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

“Drupalgeddon2” touches off arms race to mass-exploit powerful Web servers

April 20, 2018 - 8:41pm

Enlarge (credit: Torkild Retvedt)

Attackers are mass-exploiting a recently fixed vulnerability in the Drupal content management system that allows them to take complete control of powerful website servers, researchers from multiple security companies are warning.

At least three different attack groups are exploiting "Drupalgeddon2," the name given to an extremely critical vulnerability Drupal maintainers patched in late March, researchers with Netlab 360 said Friday. Formally indexed as CVE- 2018-7600, Drupalgeddon2 makes it easy for anyone on the Internet to take complete control of vulnerable servers simply by accessing a URL and injecting publicly available exploit code. Exploits allow attackers to run code of their choice without having to have an account of any type on a vulnerable website. The remote-code vulnerability harkens back to a 2014 Drupal vulnerability that also made it easy to commandeer vulnerable servers.

Drupalgeddon2 "is under active attack, and every Drupal site behind our network is being probed constantly from multiple IP addresses," Daniel Cid, CTO and founder of security firm Sucuri, told Ars. "Anyone that has not patched is hacked already at this point. Since the first public exploit was released, we are seeing this arms race between the criminals as they all try to hack as many sites as they can."

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data

April 20, 2018 - 6:46pm

Enlarge / Screenshots of the RSA Conference application from the Google Play Store. The app's Web interface leaked attendee data when supplied with a token obtained by registering the app. (credit: Google Play Store )

A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

pic.twitter.com/QzTjOvMhSi

— RSA Conference (@RSAConference) April 20, 2018

The vulnerability was discovered (at least publicly) by a security engineer who tweeted discoveries during an examination of the RSA conference mobile app, which was developed by Eventbase Technology. Within four hours of the disclosure, Eventbase had fixed the data leak—an API call that allowed anyone to download data with attendee information.

If you attended #RSAC2018 and see your first name there - sorry!

Here are the types of marijuana best for stress and anxiety, according to users

April 20, 2018 - 6:20pm

Enlarge / Inventory including "Merry N'Berry" is on display at a medical marijuana dispensary (credit: Getty | Tom Williams)

By passively monitoring user-generated data from medical cannabis patients, researchers have glimpsed the types and amounts of marijuana that seem effective for relieving symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. The findings could direct more detailed research into the best strains for specific conditions. But the data also hints at a danger of using marijuana to manage depression symptoms in the long term.

The study, published this week in the Journal of Affective Disorders by researchers at Washington State University, is based on data from a medical cannabis app called Strainprint, which lets patients track symptom severity after medical cannabis use. Before that, users enter detailed information about the strain of marijuana used, including selecting specific products from a list of those sold by licensed medical cannabis distributors in Canada. Health Canada has uniquely strict production and quality control guidelines for products sold there. But if a patient is using a product not on the list, they can manually input information about the strain, including cannabinoid content.

The researchers looked at data from nearly 1,400 medical cannabis users, analyzing outcomes from almost 12,000 inhalation sessions. The researchers kept their analysis just to sessions involving inhalation (smoking, vaping, concentrates, dab bubbler, dab portable), to try to control—at least a little—for efficacy and timing of the onset of effects.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

NYC blasts broadband competition shortage as it pursues suit against Verizon

April 20, 2018 - 4:56pm

Enlarge / New York, USA - January 14, 2016: A Verizon worker on Worth Street in Lower Manhattan. (credit: Getty Images | 400tmax)

More than two-thirds of New York City's 3.1 million households have just one or two broadband providers offering service to their homes, according to a new "Truth in Broadband" report issued by the city government. The report comes as NYC pursues a lawsuit against Verizon alleging that it hasn't met its broadband deployment obligations.

There's only one ISP offering home broadband service at 13.54 percent of the city's 3,114,826 households, meaning that nearly 422,000 households have just one "choice." Another 55.44 percent of NYC households—nearly 1.73 million in all—have two broadband providers. The remaining 31.02 percent (more than 966,000 households) have at least three broadband providers.

The report defines broadband as Internet service with at least 25Mbps download speeds and 3Mbps upload speeds, the same standard the Federal Communications Commission uses to evaluate broadband deployment progress nationwide. DSL offers some more choice, but the network technology "is not generally capable of delivering a 25Mbps download speed," the report said. The report's broadband deployment statistics are based on federal data as of December 2016.

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Four publishers must change in-game loot boxes to avoid Dutch gambling laws

April 20, 2018 - 4:34pm

Enlarge / Is this essentially the same as a kid buying a box of car skins in Rocket League? (credit: Getty)

Four publishers will be forced to make changes to their games in the Netherlands after a landmark report from the Netherlands Gaming Authority found their loot boxes violate laws against gambling.

Study into loot boxes: A treasure or a burden? (PDF) notes that an in-game loot box violates the country's laws if "the content of these loot boxes is determined by chance and... the prizes to be won can be traded outside of the game: the prizes have a market value."

While the report doesn't identify the now-illegal games directly, a report from Dutch news site NOS names them as FIFA 18, Dota 2, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, and Rocket League. Six other studied games that do not allow for items to be traded for a "market value" were found not to violate the law.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Electrify America will deploy 2,000 350kW fast chargers by the end of 2019

April 20, 2018 - 4:13pm

Enlarge / ABB, BTC Power, Efacec, and Signet will work with Electrify America on this new network of fast EV chargers. (credit: Electrify America)

As its legion of comment-posting fans love to point out, Tesla's Supercharger network is a major part of that company's success when it comes to selling electric vehicles. For over a century we've lived with cars that can be refueled in minutes, and old habits die hard. Even though the optimal solution is EV owners plugging in each night, the thought of being stranded with a slow-charging EV but hundreds of miles to drive in a day causes enough terror to rule out such cars for many potential drivers. If we want more people to make the switch, the answer then is more chargers and faster chargers. And Electrify America evidently agrees.

An offshoot of the Volkswagen empire created in the wake of the diesel emissions scandal, Electrify America has a quite ambitious plan. This week it announced it had picked suppliers for a new network of fast chargers across the country. Between now and the end of 2019, it's going to deploy 2,000 fast chargers at a total of 484 charging stations. There are still a mix of competing standards when it comes to EV charging, so Electrify America's approach is to offer them all.

That means 50kW CHAdeMO connectors and then dual-handle CCS1 chargers, capable of 50kW as well as either 150kW or 350kW (using liquid-cooled cables). Vehicles capable of charging at that higher rate aren't on sale yet, but by sheer coincidence that matches the specs of forthcoming Battery EVs from... Volkswagen Group.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Apple may still depend on Samsung for OLED iPhone screens as LG hits snags

April 20, 2018 - 3:59pm

Enlarge (credit: Samuel Axon)

Apple may be losing the fight to add another OLED display manufacturer ahead of the next iPhone production cycle. According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, LG Display is struggling to make the OLED panels Apple wants for upcoming iPhone models. Apple has been working with LG, hoping it could become its second supplier of OLED smartphone panels. Apple currently sources the OLED panels for the iPhone X from rival Samsung.

The report claims that South Korea’s LG Display ran into "manufacturing problems" that held up display production, causing LG to fall behind Apple's pre-production timeline. Apple reportedly asked LG to go through a third round of prototype production for the OLED panels, an unusual step for most component manufacturers. Ars has reached out to Apple for further comment.

If LG can't fix the problems it has reportedly been having and satisfy Apple's needs, it's unlikely that the company would be able to provide finished OLED panels for the next iPhones. According to people familiar with the matter, mass-production of fall-scheduled iPhone models typically begins in July.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tiny krill appear to mix up the ocean

April 20, 2018 - 3:04pm

Enlarge / Differences in the density of water show the complex mixing generated by a moving brine shrimp. (credit: Isabel Houghton, image obtained with the assistance and facilities of R. Strickler)

If you've heard of krill at all, it's probably in the context of their role as whale food. Nature programs love to point in amazement to the fact that the largest animals on the planet subsist on some of the smallest, namely the krill. But these tiny animals exist independently of their function as food, and a new study suggests that they and their peers may have a significant role in their ecosystems: mixing up the top layers of the ocean.

Krill are crustaceans, as a careful look at them will indicate (although Wikipedia tells us that the cool-sounding name "krill" is simply Norwegian for "small fry of fish"). They don't tend to grow much larger than a couple centimeters in length, and they feed on even smaller creatures, taking tiny photosynthetic plankton and moving them up the food chain.

But what they lack in size, they make up for with truly astonishing numbers, with some species estimated as having one of the largest total biomasses of anything on Earth. It's these vast numbers that make them a viable food for the world's largest creatures and give them the ability to replace the vast numbers gulped down by whales. It's also at the heart of the new results.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google gives up on Google Allo, hopes carriers will sort out RCS messaging

April 20, 2018 - 2:48pm

Enlarge

It's time for another chapter in the saga of Google's messaging mess. This latest news comes from The Verge, which reports that Google will be abandoning its most recent messaging app failure, Google Allo, in favor of a renewed push for the carrier-controlled RCS (Rich Communication Services) protocol.

Google Allo was Google's attempt at a WhatsApp clone, and it launched just a year-and-a-half ago with a laundry list of deficiencies. It used a phone-centric login system and didn't support using a Google account. It only worked on one device at a time and didn't have an interface for desktop or laptop computers. Distribution wasn't great either, as Allo wasn't one of the mandatory Google apps included in every Android phone. None of this really mattered since Allo didn't support sending SMS messages, so there was no one to talk to anyway. Google's other chat service, Google Hangouts, was better in nearly every way.

With such a half-baked launch, the real unknown for Google Allo was what kind of resources Google would throw at it. Like Android, which also entered a market late in the game, Allo needed a massive amount of resources to catch up to the competition. Instead, we were treated to an absolutely glacial development pace that mostly focused on new sticker packs. It took a full year before Allo addressed one of its biggest flaws—not working on a desktop—and even then, login was handled by a janky QR code pairing system that only worked on one extra device at a time. Google users expect a Google account-based login that works on all devices all the time, just like Hangouts.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Netflix film examines why NASA shunned women astronauts in early days

April 20, 2018 - 1:00pm

Enlarge / An undated file photo of some of the Mercury 13 candidates. (credit: Mercury 13 / Netflix)

This June, the world will mark the 55th anniversary of the first woman flying into space. Valentina Tereshkova, an amateur Russian skydiver, spent nearly three days in orbit inside a spherical Vostok 6 capsule. The first American woman, physicist Sally Ride, would not follow Tereshkova into space for another two decades.

A new documentary on Netflix, Mercury 13, examines the question of why NASA did not fly women in space early on and, in particular, focuses on 13 women who underwent preliminary screening processes in 1960 and 1961 to determine their suitability as astronauts. The film offers a clear verdict for why women were excluded from NASA in the space agency's early days—"good old-fashioned prejudice," as one of the participants said. Mercury 13 will be released Friday.

The film admirably brings some of these women to life, all of whom were accomplished pilots. There is Jerrie Cobb, who scored very highly in the preliminary tests and gave compelling testimony before Congress in an attempt to open NASA's early spaceflight programs to women. Another key figure is pilot Jane B. Hart, married to a US Senator from Michigan, whose experience in the project compelled her to become one of the founders of the National Organization for Women.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook removes 1.5 billion users from protection of EU privacy law

April 20, 2018 - 12:45pm

Enlarge / Mark Zuckerberg in 2017. (credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Facebook has quietly altered its terms of service, making stricter Irish data protection laws no longer binding on the vast majority of its users. The revision was first reported Wednesday by Reuters.

Now, Facebook’s headquarters in California will be responsible for processing any relevant legal claims, and American law will be binding for those outside the EU.

Previously, CEO Mark Zuckerberg had said Facebook would implement new EU rules "everywhere." While Facebook may claim that it is offering EU-style control globally, removing this provision in its own terms of service suggests that the company is trying to mitigate its potential legal liability.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Android Go review—Google’s scattershot attempt at a low-end Android OS

April 20, 2018 - 12:00pm

Enlarge (credit: Android)

Here in the US and other developed countries, the smartphone and Internet markets are more or less saturated—most people are online and swiping away at their smartphones. This isn't the case everywhere though—only about half of the worldwide population is on the Internet. That means there are more than 3.5 billion people that don't have access to the largest collection of human knowledge (and dank memes) ever assembled.

These throngs of disconnected people come from poorer countries, so when they do eventually get online, they will do so via the most inexpensive devices they can get. The cheapest online-capable devices we make are also the smallest: smartphones. And on smartphones, unless you're spending several hundred dollars on an Apple device, there's one OS out there: Android.

Google has taken to calling these people the "next billion users" and has been chasing them for some time with various programs. The effort we're looking at today, Android Go, is Google's largest to date. It offers the whole Android package but reworked with entry-level phones in mind.

Read 99 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tim Cook on merging macOS and iOS: “I don’t think that’s what users want”

April 20, 2018 - 12:00am

Enlarge / Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., speaks during an event at Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. (credit: Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

In an interview published in The Sydney Morning Herald today, Apple CEO Tim Cook suggested that Apple is not working toward eventually running the same operating system on Macs and mobile devices like the iPhone and iPad, counter to widespread speculation.

The interview took place at the education-themed event in Chicago at which Apple unveiled the last iPad. Here's the relevant quote from Cook:

We don't believe in sort of watering down one for the other. Both [the Mac and iPad] are incredible. One of the reasons that both of them are incredible is because we pushed them to do what they do well. And if you begin to merge the two... you begin to make trade-offs and compromises.

So maybe the company would be more efficient at the end of the day. But that's not what it's about. You know it's about giving people things that they can then use to help them change the world or express their passion or express their creativity. So this merger thing that some folks are fixated on, I don't think that's what users want.

Earlier this year, Bloomberg ran a report saying that Apple will soon unveil tools for developers that will allow deploying an app for both macOS and iOS machines. Apps that target both platforms would be usable with either a touchscreen or a mouse/trackpad, depending on which device launches them. While some outlets are saying Cook's statement debunks that rumor, that's not necessarily the case; apps that support macOS/iOS interoperability don't require a unified operating system.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

PUBG’s first-ever free weekend has begun on Xbox One (for XBL Gold members)

April 19, 2018 - 10:40pm

Enlarge (credit: PUBG Corp./Microsoft)

PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds (PUBG)'s stratospheric rise in popularity on PC and console has been curious, in particular because of its $30 cost of entry—a fact that sets it apart from its popular, free-to-play rival Fortnite Battle Royale. For at least a few days, however, that barrier is (for the most part) going away... if you are willing to play PUBG on Xbox One.

The console's "early access" version of the 100-person, massive-arena shooter is currently free to download and play so long as you are an Xbox Live Gold subscriber. (If you do not pay for Xbox Live Gold and are interested, now might be a good time to dig out one of the many 48-hour and 7-day trials packed into Xbox game boxes.) The game's "Free Gold Weekend" promotion runs from today, April 19, until 11:59pm ET on Sunday, April 22.

In some ways, this mostly-free version doesn't offer an ideal way to get to know the popular shooter. We defer to the frame rate analysis gurus at Digital Foundry, who took a hard look in March at what had and hadn't improved for the console version in its first three months. In short: the game is fun, but the performance issues don't help.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Southwest Airlines protested airworthiness directive designed to prevent engine failures

April 19, 2018 - 9:30pm

Enlarge / Southwest's Boeing 737-700, tail number N772SW, was the aircraft for Southwest flight 1380. A failure in its left turbofan engine caused the death of one passenger and multiple other injuries. (credit: Aeroprints)

While a National Transportation Safety Board investigation is still underway, NTSB officials confirmed that the uncontained engine failure aboard Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 was the result of a fan blade breaking from a crack near the fan's hub. The failure is similar to one that occurred on another Southwest flight in September 2016.

"The fan blade separated in two places," said NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt. "At the hub... there's a fatigue fracture where this #13 fan blade would come into that hub. It also fractured roughly halfway through it. But it appears the fatigue fracture was the initial event. We have the root part, but we don't have the outboard part. The crack was interior, so certainly not detectable from looking at it from the outside."

After that incident, the manufacturer of the engine—CFM International—issued a technical bulletin urging customers to conduct more frequent ultrasonic inspections of the fan in the type of turbofan engine used by Southwest's 737 Next Generation aircraft. In 2017, CFM even asked the FAA to enact a new rule requiring those checks. But Southwest Airlines opposed the proposed change to inspection frequency, stating in a comment to the FAA that it would take longer for the airline to comply because of the number of engines in its fleet:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 21:25.


©2001-2017 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com