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CIO.com - Opinion
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				CIO
Updated: 7 weeks 6 days ago

IDG Contributor Network: E-commerce success: 7 mistakes to avoid like the plague

August 24, 2017 - 2:37pm

E-commerce has gone from being an emerging trend to becoming the fastest growing frontier for monetizing online traffic. Internet giants Alibaba and Amazon are resounding examples of this, easily displacing brick-and-mortar stores with a streamlined service. E-commerce sites can offer faster service, quick delivery, and a range of options unheard of until recently.

As consumers continue to migrate their activities to the web, businesses are also learning how to better build their online presence. Nevertheless, constructing an e-commerce site is harder than it seems.

While the prospects of success are great, the potential pitfalls make it vital to be careful when creating a business. These are some of the worst mistakes e-commerce businesses can make when starting business

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Why rate of change should be the most important metric in your company

August 24, 2017 - 2:13pm

Tech leaders, in general, are always accused of overzealousness, setting bold expectations, imploring their teams to do the impossible. Perhaps this mania, as it were, is a response to the state of our times — the only way, some might argue, to stay relevant at a time when relevance is a very transitory thing.

I’ll save you the usual cliches about technology and change, but to really understand what distinguishes great companies from the rest, we need to understand — really understand — the world we are in today, and its changing relationship to time.

To that end, let’s consider inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil’s theses (Not just another best-selling academic, Kurzweil belongs to the entrepreneur species, having pioneered and sold four AI-based businesses.) 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How to pick collaboration tools

August 24, 2017 - 1:32pm

This is a problem that has plagued the enterprise for the last decade. With more than 2,000 different collaboration solutions available in the market today, no wonder, picking the right tool can be a conundrum for companies of all sizes.

It’s more complex than it seems

It is not just the problem of picking the right tools with the right functions, but matching those tools with those that will be using them.  Unfortunately, one size does not fit all, in this case. In working with many enterprise clients, IT had mandated that the company use SharePoint. This went to ridiculous lengths at a large Palo Alto-based software company when we interviewed a marketing executive who had paid an outside developer $30k to help create the CEO’s content to go on SharePoint. In talking with people in other departments, we found that many of them were unhappy with SharePoint, and that they were using other collaboration tools (that were easier and more transparent) to actually get work done.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: What banks can learn from fintech startups

August 24, 2017 - 1:30pm

Today, a company can spring up in a matter of weeks. Perhaps a new idea is planted overnight during a hackathon and germinated in a garage over a couple of weeks using unlimited cloud computing power, free developer tools and open APIs. Then, the startup might get watered by incubators and accelerators like Idealab and Y Combinator, helping to direct the young company toward the sunlight while sprinkling it with occasional funding to grow its products and team.   

Fintech startups Betterment and Moven, for example, were nursed in the Anthemis Foundry incubator, alongside 33 other financial services companies. These new market entrants build fast, move fast and alter consumer expectations on the types of experiences they should be getting. Traditional banks, often fraught with calcified processes and monolithic infrastructure, are being challenged, stunted and in some cases, uprooted.  

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: CIOs: Caught in the crosshairs

August 23, 2017 - 2:44pm

There are two ways to look at the current fate of the CIO role: Either the CIO is in the perfect place and time as the worlds of business and IT converge, or they are standing squarely in the "kill zone" waiting for those same converging forces to fell them.

I have been covering digital transformation for over three years and have watched with fascination as it has evolved from a new idea to its present state of frenzied hype. My hope was that as its mind share reached critical mass with business and IT executives, there would be a renaissance in strategy and action within executive suites.

Unfortunately, it appears that organizations have realized only the first half of that hope.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: CIOs: Caught in the crosshairs

August 23, 2017 - 2:44pm

There are two ways to look at the current fate of the CIO role: Either the CIO is in the perfect place and time as the worlds of business and IT converge, or they are standing squarely in the "kill zone" waiting for those same converging forces to fell them.

I have been covering digital transformation for over three years and have watched with fascination as it has evolved from a new idea to its present state of frenzied hype. My hope was that as its mind share reached critical mass with business and IT executives, there would be a renaissance in strategy and action within executive suites.

Unfortunately, it appears that organizations have realized only the first half of that hope.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: 5 tips for career rebranding

August 23, 2017 - 2:34pm

Are you stuck in a rut at work? Bored? Feel like you’re on a career train to nowhere?  Need a change?

If you answered yes to any of the above, you’re not unlike many professionals I come across in my work. People get busy with the routine of their jobs and sometimes wake up years later and wonder what happened to the time, realizing they’ve been going through the motions without enjoying what they’ve been doing. Other times, people stick with a profession they are not passionate about because it is just the path of least resistance. It’s hard to choose change, and it’s even harder to bring about change.

Recently, I mentored someone through the SMU Digital Accelerator program – let’s call him John – who was very successful in choosing to rebrand himself and change both industry and function. John was with a large IT staffing and consulting company for a long time, and had taken a role in IT infrastructure project management to gain broader management experience and increase his promotability. John realized one day that he really wanted to get back to his early-career roots of UX and to a role where digital transformation was important, but his company had him locked on another career path. Through soul searching, self-assessment, and self-reflection, John knew he needed to make a change. He successfully rebranded himself, focusing on his core strengths and interests, and he landed his dream job with a large financial services company doing exactly what he wanted to do: delight customers with an incredible user experience.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: 5 tips for career rebranding

August 23, 2017 - 2:34pm

Are you stuck in a rut at work? Bored? Feel like you’re on a career train to nowhere?  Need a change?

If you answered yes to any of the above, you’re not unlike many professionals I come across in my work. People get busy with the routine of their jobs and sometimes wake up years later and wonder what happened to the time, realizing they’ve been going through the motions without enjoying what they’ve been doing. Other times, people stick with a profession they are not passionate about because it is just the path of least resistance. It’s hard to choose change, and it’s even harder to bring about change.

Recently, I mentored someone through the SMU Digital Accelerator program – let’s call him John – who was very successful in choosing to rebrand himself and change both industry and function. John was with a large IT staffing and consulting company for a long time, and had taken a role in IT infrastructure project management to gain broader management experience and increase his promotability. John realized one day that he really wanted to get back to his early-career roots of UX and to a role where digital transformation was important, but his company had him locked on another career path. Through soul searching, self-assessment, and self-reflection, John knew he needed to make a change. He successfully rebranded himself, focusing on his core strengths and interests, and he landed his dream job with a large financial services company doing exactly what he wanted to do: delight customers with an incredible user experience.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Lending as a service (LaaS) and why it matters

August 23, 2017 - 2:28pm

The financial crisis of 2008 caused global shockwaves, wrecking businesses and wiping away thousands of dollars’ worth of individuals’ savings. World markets are still recovering to this day, and governments have enacted strong reforms to prevent a repeat occurrence. These new, stricter regulations have deeply changed the financial world. Along with shifts in consumer preferences, banks and lenders are now faced with a vastly different financing landscape.

Traditional financial services providers have tightened their lending requirements, leading to tougher barriers for regular customers to find funding. Whereas customers with weaker credit had few problems finding loans in the past, banks are now turning them away in droves. For many small business owners, this harder path to access financing through loans means that they are left with few channels to uncover the capital they need. However, developments in financial technology and online lending offer small businesses a new alternative in the form of lending as a service, or LaaS.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Lending as a service (LaaS) and why it matters

August 23, 2017 - 2:28pm

The financial crisis of 2008 caused global shockwaves, wrecking businesses and wiping away thousands of dollars’ worth of individuals’ savings. World markets are still recovering to this day, and governments have enacted strong reforms to prevent a repeat occurrence. These new, stricter regulations have deeply changed the financial world. Along with shifts in consumer preferences, banks and lenders are now faced with a vastly different financing landscape.

Traditional financial services providers have tightened their lending requirements, leading to tougher barriers for regular customers to find funding. Whereas customers with weaker credit had few problems finding loans in the past, banks are now turning them away in droves. For many small business owners, this harder path to access financing through loans means that they are left with few channels to uncover the capital they need. However, developments in financial technology and online lending offer small businesses a new alternative in the form of lending as a service, or LaaS.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: 3 keys to negotiating successful cloud agreements

August 23, 2017 - 2:15pm

Nowadays it is both impossible and impractical to avoid the cloud. Regardless of whether your organization is a growing SMB or finds itself within the Fortune 500, it is highly likely a cloud solution is currently under serious consideration or has already been implemented. Many different types of cloud offerings are available – such as software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) – as companies have been drawn to the cloud’s promises of agility, flexibility, reduced costs and faster time to benefits.

Software as a service

In the SaaS category, vendors such as Salesforce.com have been quite successful in gaining significant market share in customer relationship management (CRM), as organizations and their respective sales branches have often led with CRM to start their journey into the cloud. In the human capital management (HCM) space, vendors such as Workday, SAP (through its acquisition of SuccessFactors), and Oracle (through its acquisition of Taleo) are aggressively pushing their cloud-based offerings to the market.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: 3 keys to negotiating successful cloud agreements

August 23, 2017 - 2:15pm

Nowadays it is both impossible and impractical to avoid the cloud. Regardless of whether your organization is a growing SMB or finds itself within the Fortune 500, it is highly likely a cloud solution is currently under serious consideration or has already been implemented. Many different types of cloud offerings are available – such as software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) – as companies have been drawn to the cloud’s promises of agility, flexibility, reduced costs and faster time to benefits.

Software as a service

In the SaaS category, vendors such as Salesforce.com have been quite successful in gaining significant market share in customer relationship management (CRM), as organizations and their respective sales branches have often led with CRM to start their journey into the cloud. In the human capital management (HCM) space, vendors such as Workday, SAP (through its acquisition of SuccessFactors), and Oracle (through its acquisition of Taleo) are aggressively pushing their cloud-based offerings to the market.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Why CIOs must bet on enterprise cloud to boost digital business

August 23, 2017 - 2:08pm

Cloud thought leader Joe McKendrick was right when three years ago, in his cloud computing's second act is all business, posted on Forbes, he predicted "IT is one small piece of the cloud story. A much bigger story is coming from the business itself. The curtain is now opening on cloud computing's second act, which is all business. But this is also the hard part."

Increasingly, the business value of the recent IT innovations is being challenged. Business line (BL) leaders doubt the promised business benefits of either cloud computing or DevOps. Leaders of some top Fortune 500 companies, despite massive investments in these technologies, are being fired for deficient business transformations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Why CIOs must bet on enterprise cloud to boost digital business

August 23, 2017 - 2:08pm

Cloud thought leader Joe McKendrick was right when three years ago, in his cloud computing's second act is all business, posted on Forbes, he predicted "IT is one small piece of the cloud story. A much bigger story is coming from the business itself. The curtain is now opening on cloud computing's second act, which is all business. But this is also the hard part."

Increasingly, the business value of the recent IT innovations is being challenged. Business line (BL) leaders doubt the promised business benefits of either cloud computing or DevOps. Leaders of some top Fortune 500 companies, despite massive investments in these technologies, are being fired for deficient business transformations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How IoT is helping insurers move from the mitigation to elimination of risk

August 23, 2017 - 2:01pm

The rapid proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT) has created millions of devices measuring virtually anything in the physical world, from weather conditions and vehicle telematics to personal fitness activity and vital health signs. Over the last five years, there has been a significant uptick in the reliance on personal smart devices to help simplify and enhance consumer life. From quantifying the number of miles ran to controlling home thermostats, the IoT is becoming a necessity. Data is king, and this opens up a whole new world of possibilities for the insurance industry.

As IoT is transforming daily life, insurers must also adapt to running a business in the age of the connected customer. Today’s digitally native consumers expect higher levels of engagement, and these expectations are spurring change at an unprecedented rate.  As a result, insurance companies are identifying new ways to improve customer experience and turning policies for the first time into living, breathing products. Gone are the days of the insurance policy that is only given thought twice in its life: at point of purchase and point of claim. Thanks to emerging technologies like the IoT, the insurance industry is experiencing a digital transformation that allows insurers to turn traditional peace of mind into more frequent value-add touchpoints with policyholders. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How IoT is helping insurers move from the mitigation to elimination of risk

August 23, 2017 - 2:01pm

The rapid proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT) has created millions of devices measuring virtually anything in the physical world, from weather conditions and vehicle telematics to personal fitness activity and vital health signs. Over the last five years, there has been a significant uptick in the reliance on personal smart devices to help simplify and enhance consumer life. From quantifying the number of miles ran to controlling home thermostats, the IoT is becoming a necessity. Data is king, and this opens up a whole new world of possibilities for the insurance industry.

As IoT is transforming daily life, insurers must also adapt to running a business in the age of the connected customer. Today’s digitally native consumers expect higher levels of engagement, and these expectations are spurring change at an unprecedented rate.  As a result, insurance companies are identifying new ways to improve customer experience and turning policies for the first time into living, breathing products. Gone are the days of the insurance policy that is only given thought twice in its life: at point of purchase and point of claim. Thanks to emerging technologies like the IoT, the insurance industry is experiencing a digital transformation that allows insurers to turn traditional peace of mind into more frequent value-add touchpoints with policyholders. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How the API economy is igniting a cultural shift in businesses

August 23, 2017 - 1:30pm

We are in the middle of a generational shift in technology. The convergence of digital forces—namely mobile, SaaS, cloud, big data, Internet of Things (IoT) and social—is creating a massive disruption in the market and altering consumer expectations. Today, everything needs to be personalized, dynamic, always on and always mobile.

As a result, there’s no shortage of organizations hoping to reinvent themselves for the digital age. Success in today’s fast-paced economy relies on continuous innovation and adaptation, leaving no room for disjointed technologies and stagnant processes.

However, most organizations are struggling to adapt to this new, rapid way, which may be one of the reasons why 52 percent of the Fortune 500 have fallen off the list since 2000. It also explains a key reason why the likes of Amazon, which is manically focused on moving faster than competitors, has climbed the ranks in under eight years.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How the API economy is igniting a cultural shift in businesses

August 23, 2017 - 1:30pm

We are in the middle of a generational shift in technology. The convergence of digital forces—namely mobile, SaaS, cloud, big data, Internet of Things (IoT) and social—is creating a massive disruption in the market and altering consumer expectations. Today, everything needs to be personalized, dynamic, always on and always mobile.

As a result, there’s no shortage of organizations hoping to reinvent themselves for the digital age. Success in today’s fast-paced economy relies on continuous innovation and adaptation, leaving no room for disjointed technologies and stagnant processes.

However, most organizations are struggling to adapt to this new, rapid way, which may be one of the reasons why 52 percent of the Fortune 500 have fallen off the list since 2000. It also explains a key reason why the likes of Amazon, which is manically focused on moving faster than competitors, has climbed the ranks in under eight years.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Splunk’s CIO on DevOps, APIs and the evolving role of IT

August 22, 2017 - 4:57pm

The role of IT has evolved from a centralized delivery model to IT as a service, where IT-owned capabilities are being offered as a service throughout the business to drive new levels of agility. One CIO embracing the changing role is Declan Morris of Splunk, which enables organizations to turn massive streams of data into operational intelligence. (Disclosure: Splunk is a customer of my employer, MuleSoft.)

In this Q&A, Declan explains how Splunk’s IT team is driving value across the organization and partnering with the business to deliver on unified vision focused on customers and growth. Recalling his experiences at Splunk and Adobe – where he was on the original team that helped launch Adobe Creative Cloud – Declan shares best practices around how CIOs can take advantage of the technology trends impacting every industry and how CIOs can help pivot to new business models when needed. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Splunk’s CIO on DevOps, APIs and the evolving role of IT

August 22, 2017 - 4:57pm

The role of IT has evolved from a centralized delivery model to IT as a service, where IT-owned capabilities are being offered as a service throughout the business to drive new levels of agility. One CIO embracing the changing role is Declan Morris of Splunk, which enables organizations to turn massive streams of data into operational intelligence. (Disclosure: Splunk is a customer of my employer, MuleSoft.)

In this Q&A, Declan explains how Splunk’s IT team is driving value across the organization and partnering with the business to deliver on unified vision focused on customers and growth. Recalling his experiences at Splunk and Adobe – where he was on the original team that helped launch Adobe Creative Cloud – Declan shares best practices around how CIOs can take advantage of the technology trends impacting every industry and how CIOs can help pivot to new business models when needed. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

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