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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
28%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
10%
1200 - 1500 GB
10%
1500 - 2000 GB
13%
> 2000 GB
20%
Total votes: 40

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Industry & Technology

Black Horse slowed down: Lloyds Banking Group confirms problem with 'Faster' payments

The Register - 49 min 32 sec ago
Friday morning is an ideal time for transfers to have a glitch, agree customers

Lloyds and Halifax bank customers have been warned not to make repeat transactions as the group grapples with a technical glitch with Faster Payments.…

Twenty legal battles that stand out across Ars’ 20 years of covering them

Ars Technica - 1 hour 2 min ago

Enlarge / The US Supreme Court is shown on the day of the investiture ceremony for new Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh on November 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. (credit: Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

The legal system is often a confounding place, where disputes are adjudicated—it’s a world full of jargon that we journalists try to explain as best we can. And over the last two decades, legal cases have remained a fixture on Ars Technica.

We’ve brought you endless news of initial criminal or civil complaints in that time. And in the most important cases, Ars has followed them, blow by blow, through various motions. We sat in every session for the criminal trial of Silk Road mastermind Ross Ulbricht and took a similar approach to the API patents saga of Oracle v. Google, for instance.

Just this week, Ars sat in the courtroom as Defense Distributed and the State of New Jersey argued over legal jurisdiction and matters of free speech intersecting with future technology. It echoes back to our site's legacy of watching the march of technology and innovation directly intersect with an evolving legal system—it has been nearly 20 years since we covered Microsoft’s infamous antitrust battles around the turn of the century. These literally became the subject of CNN decade documentaries since then.

Read 120 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Lords of the DNS remind admins about Flag Day, Juniper likes Watson and more

The Register - 1 hour 28 min ago
PING, PING, PING … it's your networking roundup for the week

Roundup To cure some persistent security, implementation, and performance problems in the Domain Name System, the lords of the DNS have proclaimed older implementations as end of life.…

Rocket Report: Iranian booster failure, SpaceX cuts, Vulcan near final design

Ars Technica - 1 hour 31 min ago

Enlarge / A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base. (credit: Aurich Lawson/SpaceX)

Welcome to Edition 1.32 of the Rocket Report! As we get deeper into the new year, the launch business is starting to heat up, especially among the smaller rockets. Companies are eyeing launch sites, securing launch contracts, and scrambling on development of their rockets. This is simply going to be a huge year for small-sat launchers, and we're going to do our best to stay on top of everything.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Relativity Space to launch from historic Florida site. The company that aspires to 3D print almost the entirety of its rockets has reached an agreement with the US Air Force to launch from historic facilities at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Relativity Space said Thursday it has a multiyear contract to build and operate its own rocket launch facilities at Launch Complex 16, Ars reported.

Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Twitter admits bug exposed some Android users' protected tweets for years - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 56 min ago
A security flaw may have disabled the "Protect your Tweets" setting.

For teens, digital technology is good. Or bad. Or maybe neutral?

Ars Technica - 2 hours 1 min ago

Enlarge (credit: SimpleTexting.com)

In South Korea, people under the age of 16 can’t play online games between midnight and 6am. The UK Parliament has launched an official inquiry into “the impact of social media and screen use on young people’s health.” Meanwhile in the United States, the Wait Until 8th campaign asks parents to delay giving their children a smartphone until they’re in eighth grade. Worry about kids and technology is rampant—so have smartphones, in fact, destroyed a generation?

A paper published in Nature Human Behaviour this week answers that question, often differently, thousands and thousands of times. Researchers Amy Orben and Andrew Przybylski took three huge datasets and threw every possible meaningful question at them. In part, their analysis is an illustration of how different researchers can get wildly different answers from the same data. But cumulatively, the answers they came up with indicate that tech use correlates with a teeny-tiny dent in adolescent well-being—and that there’s a big problem with big data.

High numbers don’t necessarily mean high quality

Studying small numbers of people, or rats, or trees can be a problem for scientists. Comparisons between small groups of subjects might miss a real finding or luck out and find something that looks like a pattern but is actually just noise. And it’s always tricky to generalize from a small group to a whole population. Sometimes small is the only sort of data that’s available, but some research disciplines have had the recent(-ish) boon of gigantic, rich datasets to work with.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Timeline: What's going on with Huawei?

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 4 min ago
The Chinese telecoms giant was the focus of international scrutiny even before a senior executive's arrest.

Lawyers' secure email network goes down, firm says it'll take two weeks to restore

The Register - 2 hours 7 min ago
And could wipe users' inboxes during that fortnight of faffery

Barristers and court prosecutors have been left scratching their heads this morning after Egress Technologies' CJSM email system went down – with the firm saying it could take up to a fortnight to fully restore it.…

2019 Lexus ES 300h review: Luxury and efficiency in spades - Roadshow

cNET.com - Reviews - 2 hours 33 min ago
Sharp styling, comfy-cozy accommodations and excellent efficiency make the Lexus ES 300h a compelling luxury offering.

Twitter warns that private tweets were public for years

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 38 min ago
A security flaw meant many private messages were readable for years said Twitter.

I used to be a dull John Doe. Thanks to Huawei, I'm now James Bond!

The Register - 3 hours 7 min ago
We'll know for sure when Huawei reveals a shoe-shaped smartphone

Something for the Weekend, Sir? The name's McLeod. Alessandro McLeod. I am a spy for the secret services.…

Every upcoming Marvel movie and TV show - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 19 min ago
If it's confirmed or rumored, it's on this list.

Mortal Kombat 11's first gameplay footage: new fatalities, characters revealed - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 38 min ago
Mortal Kombat 11 is pairing its familiar ultraviolence with more character customization.

At 900k lines of code, ONOS is getting heavy. Can it go on a diet?

The Register - 3 hours 39 min ago
'Net greybeard Douglas Comer talks SDN with El Reg

Interview Software Defined Networking (SDN) has changed the landscape of networking, but along the way it has created its own problems. Doug Comer of Purdue University thinks disaggregating SDN controllers like the Open Source Network Operating System (ONOS) could be a way forward.…

Netflix shows Bird Box and Elite drive subscriber growth

BBC Technology News - 4 hours 27 min ago
The streaming giant says the subscriber growth reflects the success of its original programmes.

Robot dinosaur sacked and other technology news

BBC Technology News - 4 hours 56 min ago
BBC Click’s Stephen Beckett looks at some of the best tech news stories of the week.

Are you sure your disc drive has stopped rotating, or are you just ignoring the messages?

The Register - 5 hours 13 min ago
Did this story make you angry? Y/N

On Call Roll up, roll up, to On Call, your weekly instalment of fellow readers’ tech triumphs and frustrations.…

Watch an AI robot program itself to, er, pick things up and push them around

The Register - 6 hours 11 sec ago
Why can't robots just learn to do things without being told?

Vid Robots normally need to be programmed in order to get them to perform a particular task, but they can be coaxed into writing the instructions themselves with the help of machine learning, according to research published in Science.…

Germany 'considers ban on Huawei' amid global backlash

BBC Technology News - 6 hours 12 min ago
Other countries have barred the Chinese firm from their network infrastructure over security concerns.

Microsoft blue biz bug bounty bonanza beckons

The Register - 7 hours 10 min ago
Azure DevOps Services invites hackers to test its limits

There's more money to be made from bug hunting in Microsoft code after Redmond announced its 10th active bug hunting reward scheme, the Azure DevOps Bounty Program.…


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