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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
15%
200 - 500 GB
27%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
9%
1200 - 1500 GB
12%
1500 - 2000 GB
12%
> 2000 GB
21%
Total votes: 33

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Industry & Technology

New Netflix Stranger Things season 3 teaser reveals episode titles - CNET

cNET.com - News - 41 min 23 sec ago
"In the summer of 1985, the adventure continues." Get more clues as to what's in store for your favorite Upside Down kids in 2019.

Best wireless headphones for making calls - CNET

cNET.com - News - 46 min 36 sec ago
The microphone and communications features are better on some wireless headphones than others. Here are some our current favorites for making cell-phone calls.

The 51 best VR games of 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 4 min ago
What's worth playing in virtual reality? Here are all our favorites.

New study gives some handy tips on how to survive on Game of Thrones

Ars Technica - 1 hour 46 min ago

Enlarge / How has Tyrion Lannister survived for so long? Being high born helps, being male doesn't. His willingness to switch his allegiance to Daenerys Targaryen likely tipped the balance. (credit: HBO)

Game of Thrones boasts one of the highest body counts on TV, knocking off even major characters in some very gruesome ways. Perhaps even more surprising is who still survives as we head into the final season. A new paper in the journal Injury Epidemiology offers some insights into the best strategies to ensure survival in the brutal world of Westeros.

(Some spoilers for first seven seasons below.)

This isn't the first time Game of Thrones has inspired a scientific paper. One 2016 study examined the Greyscale skin disease, while a 2017 study explored fight or flight responses of various characters on the show. And there was a lively discussion among chemists over what real poison was most similar to "The Strangler" used at the infamous Purple Wedding in season 4.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

2018 Gamers' Choice Awards: How to watch, nominees, winners - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 52 min ago
CBS is the first to air a video games award show on a broadcast network.

Apple's HomePod is back to its Black Friday price - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 1 min ago
The high-end speaker is $250 at Target, $100 off its usual price.

Deal alert: The 2018 iPad is back to its Black Friday sale price of $250 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 14 min ago
Get $80 off at Target on the 32GB or 128GB versions.

Bionic 3D-printed arm 'gives confidence' to young amputees

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 19 min ago
Open Bionics has developed the world's first medically-certified 3D-printed artificial arm

This AI gave classic cookies the nuttiest new names - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 19 min ago
Would you eat Canical Bear-Widded Nutts?

Xbox One bundles drop as low as $219 at Walmart - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 23 min ago
Get the Xbox One S with games like Battlefield V and NBA 2K19 at prices better than Black Friday.

Attention Xbox One owners, this wireless headset deserves consideration - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 40 min ago
The LucidSound LS35X has premium looks, good audio quality and built-in Xbox Wireless.

50 years on, we’re living the reality first shown at the “Mother of All Demos”

Ars Technica - 3 hours 1 min ago

Douglas Engelbart during his 1968 demonstration. (credit: SRI International)

A half century ago, computer history took a giant leap when Douglas Engelbart—then a mid-career 43-year-old engineer at Stanford Research Institute in the heart of Silicon Valley—gave what has come to be known as the "mother of all demos."

On December 9, 1968 at a computer conference in San Francisco, Engelbart showed off the first inklings of numerous technologies that we all now take for granted: video conferencing, a modern desktop-style user interface, word processing, hypertext, the mouse, collaborative editing, among many others.

Even before his famous demonstration, Engelbart outlined his vision of the future more than a half-century ago in his historic 1962 paper, "Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework."

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Xbox One for $219, iPad for $250: Best deals since Black Friday - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 10:47pm
Black Friday is over, but sales are everywhere. Like Google's Pixel 3 Black Friday prices are back, the Xbox One hits a new price low and the new iPad is just $250 at Target.

See trains from all over the world - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 10:35pm
From high-speed electrics to workhorse diesel-electrics, here's a selection of trains from other countries.

Watch 20,000 Jedi and 3,000 Tyrannosaurus rex fight to the death - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 10:34pm
Who will win in the epic battle between Jedi Knights and T-Rex? This geeky Epic Battle Simulator video pits Star Wars against dinosaurs.

Are US trains really that bad? It's complicated - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 10:23pm
With limited routes and low-speed diesel locomotives, train travel in the US seems far behind the rest of the world. That's not going to change anytime soon.

Shazam superhero movie with Zachary Levi: Release date, trailer, cast - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 9:45pm
Here's our ongoing guide to the upcoming DC Comics film starring Zachary Levi.

HP Chromebook x2 review: Gives Surface Pro, Pixel Slate, iPad Pro a run for their money - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - December 9, 2018 - 9:23pm
The x2 strikes a nearly perfect balance between laptop and tablet -- at a Chromebook price.

NASA offers Marvel advice on saving Tony Stark trapped in space - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 9, 2018 - 8:48pm
Ground control to Major Tony: The Avengers: Endgame trailer revealed Stark's stuck.

Eleven researchers publish sharp critique of EPA fuel economy logic

Ars Technica - December 9, 2018 - 8:30pm

In this week's edition of Science, eleven researchers from prominent universities around the US criticized the federal government's justification for rolling back vehicle fuel economy standards. They wrote that the economic assumptions made in the government's 2018 report resulted in a "flawed" analysis that will likely result in more traffic fatalities, more congestion, and more greenhouse gases emitted.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under Trump has moved to rescind a number of environmentally-minded regulations instituted under the Obama Administration. One of the first in its crosshairs was the EPA's Greenhouse Gas (GHG) standards for light trucks and passenger vehicles, which paralleled the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). These two regulations (the GHG and CAFE rules) both aimed to force automakers to adhere to gradually-tightening fuel efficiency standards, which were detailed out to 2025.

The EPA under Administrator Scott Pruitt spent most of 2017 laying the groundwork to rescind the GHG rules, saying the rules were onerous for automakers. But it's hard to rescind and replace existing law—agencies need to justify their decisions with robust studies showing that a rules change will improve the livelihood of Americans, whether in health or in jobs.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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