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Industry & Technology

Facebook’s auto-captions for a recent launch video are hilariously bad

Ars Technica - 1 hour 18 min ago

An Antares rocket built by Northrop Grumman launched on Wednesday afternoon, boosting a Cygnus spacecraft with 3.4 tons of cargo toward the International Space Station. The launch from Wallops Island, Virginia, went flawlessly, and the spacecraft arrived at the station on Friday.

However, when NASA's International Space Station program posted the launch video to its Facebook page on Thursday, there was a problem. Apparently the agency's caption service hadn't gotten to this video clip yet, so viewers with captions enabled were treated not just to the glory of a rocket launch, but the glory of Facebook's automatically generated crazywords. As of Thursday morning, 86,995 people had watched the Facebook video.

Some of the captions are just hilariously bad. For example, when the announcer triumphantly declares, "And we have liftoff of the Antares NG-11 mission to the ISS," the automatically generated caption service helpfully says, "And we have liftoff of the guitarist G 11 mission to the ice sets."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Unexpected protection added to Microsoft Edge subverts IE security

Ars Technica - 2 hours 8 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Brian Smithson / Flickr)

A researcher has uncovered strange and unexpected behavior in Windows 10 that allows remote attackers to steal data stored on hard drives when a user opens a malicious file downloaded with the Edge browser.

The threat partially surfaced last week when a different researcher, John Page, reported what he called a flaw in Internet Explorer. Page claimed that when using the file manager to open a maliciously crafted MHT file downloaded with Internet Explorer, the browser uploaded one or more files to a remote server. According to Page, the vulnerability affected the most recent version of IE, version 11, running on Windows 7, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2012 R2 with all security updates installed. (It’s no longer clear whether any OS other than Windows 10 is affected, at least for some users. More about that in a moment.)

Below this paragraph in Page's post was a video demonstration of the proof-of-concept exploit Page created. It shows a booby-trapped MHT file triggering an upload of the host computer's system.ini file to a remote server. Interestingly, while Page's post says his exploit is triggered when the malicious file is downloaded by IE, and makes no mention of Edge at all, the video shows the file being downloaded with the newer Microsoft browser.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Iron Man VR preview makes me want to put on nerdy headgear again

Ars Technica - 2 hours 58 min ago

Trailer for PSVR game Marvel's Iron Man VR

AUSTIN, Texas—In some ways, I am the worst candidate among the Ars Technica gaming braintrust to demo the world premiere of Iron Man VR, a video game slated to launch on PlayStation VR by the end of this year. I have never used a PSVR, let alone any VR headset between the pricey HTC Vive and the build-it-yourself Nintendo Labo VR. And I'm an inconsistent Marvel movie follower at best. If we don't count the early 2000s Spider-Man trilogy, Black Panther is my only MCU reference point.

But maybe that actually makes me the best candidate to fake like Tony Stark via a bulky headset. There is no veneer of VR snobbery to rely on. Instead, I had simple questions: Is this fun? Would I do it again, and for longer?

After a 20-minute(ish) flight test with a rep from the devs at Camouflaj (the studio behind the upcoming PSVR game) nearby, I can still confidently say the old X-Men co-op arcade cabinet remains my favorite Marvel game of all-time. But I would absolutely be down to fly around a bit more in Iron Man's ruby-red armor soon, which is probably good news for millions of VR and Marvel novices who might be intrigued by the possibility of becoming their own living-room Iron Person.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Rocket Report: A new Delta 2, Blue Origin inks with NASA, a fiery Falcon Heavy

Ars Technica - 3 hours 28 min ago

Enlarge / The Rocket Report is published weekly. (credit: Arianespace)

Welcome to Edition 1.45 of the Rocket Report! This week, half of our stories concern the biggest rockets on the planet, from Blue Origin engine tests at Marshall Space Flight Center to NASA's efforts to accelerate development of the Space Launch System.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Stratolaunch flies for the first time. The world's largest airplane, nicknamed Roc, took to the skies for the first time on Saturday, April 13. The flight lasted 150 minutes, during which time the aircraft reached a maximum altitude of 15,000 feet and a top speed of 189mph, Parabolic Arc reports. Backed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and built by Burt Rutan's Scaled Composites, the aircraft is designed to air-launch satellites using boosters carried on the wing between its two fuselages.

Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Robot dogs pull truck and other tech news

BBC Technology News - 10 hours 8 min ago
BBC Click's Jen Copestake looks at some of the week's best technology stories.

In new gaffe, Facebook improperly collects email contacts for 1.5 million

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 10:40pm

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

Facebook's privacy gaffes keep coming. On Wednesday, the social media company said it collected the stored email address lists of as many as 1.5 million users without permission. On Thursday, the company said the number of Instagram users affected by a previously reported password storage error was in the "millions," not the "tens of thousands" as previously estimated.

Facebook said the email contact collection was the result of a highly flawed verification technique that instructed some users to supply the password for the email address associated with their account if they wanted to continue using Facebook. Security experts almost unanimously criticized the practice, and Facebook dropped it as soon as it was reported.

In a statement issued to reporters, Facebook wrote:

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Microsoft buys Express Logic, adds a third operating system to its IoT range

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 10:25pm

Enlarge / Multi-threading. (credit: Jamie Golden / Flickr)

Not content with having a Windows-based Internet of Things platform (Windows 10 IoT) and a Linux-based Internet of Things platform (Azure Sphere), Microsoft has added a third option. The company has announced that it has bought Express Logic and its ThreadX real-time operating system for an undisclosed sum.

Real-time operating systems (RTOSes) differ from more conventional platforms in their predictability. With an RTOS, a developer can guarantee that, for example, interrupt handling or switching from one process to another takes a known, bounded amount of time. This gives applications strong guarantees that they'll be able to respond in time to hardware events, timers, or other things that might make an application want to use the CPU. This predictability is essential for control applications; for example, ThreadX was used in NASA's Deep Impact mission that hurled a large object at a comet. ThreadX was also used in the iPhone 4's cellular radio controller, and ThreadX is embedded in the firmware of many Wi-Fi devices. These tasks need the determinism of an RTOS because there are timing constraints on how quickly they need to respond.

Linux can be built with various options to offer more predictable behavior and so can address some similar scenarios. But ThreadX has another big advantage up its sleeve: it's tiny. A minimal ThreadX installation takes 2,000 bytes of storage and needs 1KB of RAM, far less than Linux can use. By way of comparison, Microsoft's Sphere hardware (which uses a custom-designed ARM processor with various security features embedded) has 4MB of RAM for applications and 16MB of storage. There are an estimated 6.2 billion deployments of ThreadX running on several dozen different kinds of processor or microcontroller.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook is working on an AI voice assistant similar to Alexa, Google Assistant

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 9:50pm

Enlarge / Along with video chatting through Facebook Messenger, both Portal devices have built-in Amazon Alexa. (credit: Facebook)

Facebook is working on developing an AI voice assistant similar in functionality to Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, or Siri, according to a report from CNBC and a later statement from a Facebook representative.

The CNBC report, which cites "several people familiar with the matter," says the project has been ongoing since early 2018 in the company's offices in Redmond, Washington. The endeavor is led by Ira Snyder, whose listed title on LinkedIn is "Director, AR/VR and Facebook Assistant at Facebook." Facebook Assistant may be the name of the project. CNBC writes that Facebook has been reaching out to vendors in the smart-speaker supply chain, suggesting that Portal may only be the first of many smart devices the company makes.

When contacted for comment, Facebook sent a statement to Reuters, The Verge, and others, saying: "We are working to develop voice and AI assistant technologies that may work across our family of AR/VR products including Portal, Oculus, and future products."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Dealmaster: A number of big-name video games are discounted today

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 7:25pm

Enlarge (credit: Ars Technica)

Greetings, Arsians! The Dealmaster is back with another round of deals to share, and a number of high-profile video games all happen to be discounted at the same time today.

You can see the full selection of deals below, but a good chunk of what we've found includes games that launched within the past six or seven months. A few highlights include Marvel's Spider-Man available for $30, which is a $10 discount, and Kingdom Hearts III available for $40, which is $20 off. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is still $10 off, as is Devil May Cry 5, which released to acclaim just last month. Red Dead Redemption 2Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Resident Evil 2, and Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 are all currently slashed as well.

Note that most of these sales focus on consoles and cover physical copies instead of digital download codes. Just about every video game drops in price after a little while on the market, so if you're not aching to pick up anything below, we're likely to see each fall a few bucks further in the coming months. But if you missed out on one of these games at launch and have been curious to give it a try, this might be a good time to jump aboard.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Idris Elba steals the show as “Black Superman” in Hobbs and Shaw trailer

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 7:01pm

Hobbs and Shaw trailer.

Universal Pictures dropped a second trailer for the studio's forthcoming Hobbs and Shaw, the first spinoff of its wildly popular Fast and Furious franchise. It looks like it will be the perfect summer popcorn movie, with ludicrous over-the-top action, Idris Elba stealing every scene as a cocky super-soldier, and the lovable, wisecracking duo of Hobbs and Shaw putting aside their differences yet again to save the world.

(Spoilers for some of the prior films in Fast and Furious franchise below.)

The first film in the series, The Fast and the Furious, debuted in 2001, and it focused on an undercover cop (the late Paul Walker) taking on a group of car hijackers led by Vin Diesel's Dominic Toretto. It earned more than $200 million worldwide against its relatively modest $38 million budget, so the film was followed by seven equally successful sequels and two short tie-in films. It's now Universal Pictures' most successful franchise of all time, grossing more than $5 billion worldwide. This juggernaut shows no signs of stopping: the ninth and tenth films are already in development, slated for release in April 2020 and 2021, respectively.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ajit Pai proposes blocking China-owned telecom from US phone market

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 6:02pm

Enlarge / Chess queens with US and Chinese flags. (credit: Getty Images | Elen11)

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has proposed denying China Mobile USA's application to offer telecom services in the US, saying the Chinese government-owned company poses a security risk.

The FCC is scheduled to vote on an order to deny the application at its open meeting on May 9, and Pai yesterday announced his opposition to China Mobile entering the US market.

"After reviewing the evidence in this proceeding, including the input provided by other federal agencies, it is clear that China Mobile's application to provide telecommunications services in our country raises substantial and serious national security and law enforcement risks," Pai said. "Therefore, I do not believe that approving it would be in the public interest. I hope that my colleagues will join me in voting to reject China Mobile's application."

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Robot news presenter causes a stir on Russian TV

BBC Technology News - April 18, 2019 - 5:32pm
The humanoid, named Alex, causes a stir as he makes his debut on state news channel Rossiya 24.

Amazon and Google settle feud, bring YouTube back to Fire TV devices

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 4:06pm

Enlarge / The Fire TV Cube is a small Fire TV with an Echo Dot baked into it. It has a shiny black finish around the sides, with a matte black top. (credit: Jeff Dunn)

Feuding tech giants Amazon and Google have come to an agreement on their streaming services. After over a year of absence, the official YouTube app will return to Amazon Fire TV devices and Fire TV Edition smart TVs. Google pulled the video streaming app in early 2018 after it could not strike a deal with the online retail giant surrounding the availability of its products and services.

According to reports at the time, Google was unhappy with Amazon because the retailer didn't sell a number of its products, including Chromecast and Google Home devices. The two companies couldn't strike a business deal that pleased both parties, so Google removed the official YouTube app from Fire TV devices at the start of 2018. This came after Google also revoked YouTube access on Amazon's Echo Show devices, citing a "broken user experience."

In the time since YouTube left Fire TVs, users have been able to access the site using browsers. But that experience isn't the most user-friendly, so the real losers in this situation were YouTube lovers that owned Fire TV devices.

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Report: Cheaper “Switch Lite” will be dockable, come in the fall

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 3:58pm

Enlarge / A miniature version of the standard Switch dock.

A new report from Japanese news service Nikkei (Google translation) suggests a rumored "less expensive" version of the Switch will be available this fall. The report also suggests that the new design will not be strictly portable, as some have suggested, and will still be able to dock to a TV set for larger-screen play.

Nikkei's report adds a bit more context to rumors most recently reported by the Wall Street Journal in March regarding Nintendo's plans for two new Switch models in the near future. The second model, according to the WSJ report, would be a more expensive, "enhanced" version of the system with improved hardware power and other special features.

Public translations of Nikkei's report suggest that an "overhauled next-generation model" could actually replace the current Switch and bring enhancements "including usability, improved image rendering, and changes to the operating system, among other things." But Nikkei's development sources suggest that the next step in hardware power may still be in the early planning stages at Nintendo, with no one assigned to lead "conceptual development" as of yet.

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Jerrie Cobb, one of the most gifted female pilots in history, has died

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 2:53pm

Geraldyn “Jerrie” M. Cobb, a noted aviation pioneer and fierce advocate for women flying into space, died March 18 at her home in Florida, her family has revealed. She was 88.

Cobb is perhaps most well-known for her participation in what became known as the "Mercury 13," a group of 13 women who passed preliminary screening processes in 1960 and 1961 to determine their suitability as astronauts under the guidance of Dr. Randolph Lovelace. Cobb scored in the top 2 percent of all who had taken the battery of tests for candidates previously, including both women and men.

However, the privately funded effort was not officially sanctioned by NASA. A Netflix documentary about the experience, released in 2018, offered a clear verdict for why women were excluded from NASA in the space agency's early days—"good old-fashioned prejudice," as one of the participants said.

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Elon Musk swaps shots with Museum of English Rural Life

BBC Technology News - April 18, 2019 - 12:45pm
The Museum of English Rural Life now appears as Elon Musk on Twitter after he used their sheep picture.

Staffsource: Ars’ most coveted work-from-home essentials

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 12:15pm

Enlarge (credit: Jon Brodkin)

We at Ars have a unique work situation: instead of congregating in a stuffy office among the maze of stuffy offices in a high-rise in a big city, each of us works from the comfort of our home. Some of us have been doing so for decades, while others have only a few work-from-home years under our belts. It's an adjustment to go from an office environment to your living room, bedroom, or home office, but each of us has found unique ways to make it work and ensure our motivation and productivity levels stay high (most of the time).

That couldn't happen without key things we've grown attached to in our homes. For most of us, making adjustments to our at-home working spaces has been crucial to maintaining our mental and physical wellbeing. While some of us have found we cannot live without certain objects we already used regularly, others among us have invested in things that make our work-from-home lives better. Check out some of our work-from-home essentials below.

Note: Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs.

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Facebook bans UK far right groups and leaders

BBC Technology News - April 18, 2019 - 12:00pm
A dozen named groups and individuals will be purged from the social network, it said.

You can now download the source code for all Infocom text adventure classics

Ars Technica - April 18, 2019 - 11:30am

Enlarge / The Apple II, one of the myriad personal computers used to play Infocom games years ago. (credit: SSPL/Getty Images)

The source code of every Infocom text adventure game has been uploaded to code-sharing repository GitHub, allowing savvy programmers to examine and build upon some of the most beloved works of digital storytelling to date.

There are numerous repositories under the name historicalsource, each for a different game. Titles include, but are not limited to, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the GalaxyPlanetfall, Shogun, and several Zork games—plus some more unusual inclusions like an incomplete version of Hitchhiker's sequel The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, Infocom samplers, and an unreleased adaptation of James Cameron's The Abyss.

The code was uploaded by Jason Scott, an archivist who is the proprietor of textfiles.com. His website describes itself as "a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them"—in particular those of the 1980s. He announced the GitHub uploads on Twitter earlier this week.

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Facebook copied email contacts of 1.5 million users

BBC Technology News - April 18, 2019 - 9:13am
The social network was grabbing email contacts of some new users for almost three years, it says.

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