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For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
38%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
41%
Manual into existing VRC
3%
Manual into new VRC
19%
Total votes: 37

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Industry & Technology

Some Instacart workers to strike over pay that can be as low as $1 per hour

Ars Technica - 13 min 22 sec ago

Enlarge / Kaitlin Myers, a shopper for Instacart, studies her smartphone as she shopped for a customer at Whole Foods in Denver. Myers received a grocery list for a shopper and then completed the shopping on Tuesday, October 28, 2014. (credit: Denver Post Photo by Cyrus McCrimmon)

OAKLAND, Calif.—Seated at a dimly-lit bar, a gregarious man dressed in a scarf and beanie of his favorite local sports team, explained to Ars last week why he and some of his fellow Instacart shoppers plan on not working this Sunday and Monday.

"We’re going to sign up for shifts and then when it’s time, if I’m working from 10am to 1pm on [November 19], the first order, I’m going to decline it, not accept the batch," he said, using Instacart’s term for multiple pickups at a single retail location. "They’ll kick us off and we’ll continue to do that until they kick us off [for the day]."

The man, who goes by Ike, declined to let Ars use his full name for fear of reprisal—he also doesn’t want unwanted scrutiny from his colleagues at his full-time public sector job.

Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

What I learned visiting my first live eSports tournament

Ars Technica - 1 hour 15 min ago

Kyle Orland

At this point, I don't have much patience for the argument that eSports fans should stop watching other people play video games and just play those games themselves.

For one, it's an argument that few people make about spectator sports like basketball and football, where the skill difference between a pro and a novice is roughly the same as in eSports. For another, the thrill of watching a competitor at the top of his or her game is entirely distinct (and better in some ways) from competing yourself.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

How an unpaid UK researcher saved the Japanese seaweed industry

Ars Technica - 2 hours 34 min ago

Enlarge / A nori farm off the coast of Japan. (credit: H. Grobe)

The tasty Japanese seaweed nori is ubiquitous today, but that wasn't always true. Nori was once called “lucky grass” because every year's harvest was entirely dependent on luck. Then, during World War II, luck ran out. No nori would grow off the coast of Japan, and farmers were distraught. But a major scientific discovery on the other side of the planet revealed something unexpected about the humble plant and turned an unpredictable crop into a steady and plentiful food source.

Nori is most familiar to us when it's wrapped around sushi. It looks less familiar when floating in the sea, but for centuries, farmers in Japan, China, and Korea knew it by sight. Every year, they would plant bamboo poles strung with nets in the coastal seabed and wait for nori to build up on them.

At first it would look like thin filaments. Then, with luck, it grew into healthy, harvestable plants with long, green leaves. The farmers never saw seeds or seedlings, so no one could cultivate it. The filaments simply appeared every year. That is, they appeared until after World War II, when pollution, industrialization along the coast, and a series of violent typhoons led to a disastrous drop in harvests. By 1951, nori production in Japan had been all but wiped out.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

'Justice League': 7 burning questions about what comes next - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 15 min ago
CNET explores what clues the film leaves for the future of the DC Extended Universe.

Legend of the seas: a look inside the massive RMS Queen Mary - CNET

cNET.com - News - 4 hours 15 min ago
Bigger than the Titanic, and the finest transport of her day, the RMS Queen Mary is now a museum and hotel. Here’s the full tour.

Above and below decks of the beautiful Queen Mary - CNET

cNET.com - News - 4 hours 15 min ago
Bigger than the Titanic, nearly as long as New York's Chrysler Building is tall, and once carried 16,082 soldiers from NY to England in WWII, here what the incredible RMS Queen Mary looks like inside.

Hammond: Driverless cars will be on UK roads by 2021

BBC Technology News - 4 hours 54 min ago
The chancellor says the country must embrace new technologies in order to succeed.

What to play this weekend: Star Wars, Pokemon and Skyrim - CNET

cNET.com - News - 16 hours 37 min ago
There's something for everyone this week. Even PlayStation Vita owners.

The 31 best Black Friday 2017 deals so far - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 11:01pm
Some are available now, some start by Thanksgiving, but all of them will be in effect by Black Friday, Nov. 24. Here are the absolute best deals we've found so far.

The inner workings of surreal mechanical sculptures - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 10:41pm
For a new exhibit, artists bring creatures to colorful life though objects that are part toys, part art and part science.

I went to buy an iPhone X. AT&T told me Galaxy Note 8 is better - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 10:07pm
Commentary: An AT&T salesman tells me it's quite obvious why Samsung's large phone is better than Apple's future of the smartphone.

The Audiophiliac picks the best speakers of 2017 - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 8:47pm
Here they are, the best of the best sound bars, desktop, bookshelf, and tower speakers of 2017.

This crazy Bluetooth speaker turntable system actually works - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 7:47pm
The +Audio’s The+Record Player manages to combine a record player and Bluetooth speaker in a single box, and the Audiophiliac even liked the sound.

Best pre-Black Friday deals you can get right now - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 6:00pm
Why wait? There are already some great deals out there -- without the need to wait in line at 4 a.m.

Oh baby! 'Incredibles 2' teaser launches a Jack-Jack attack - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 5:29pm
The long-anticipated sequel to the 2004 Pixar hit starring the super-powered family is just around the corner.

Arecibo spared the axe: Iconic observatory vital to science lives on

The Register - November 18, 2017 - 3:12pm
NSF approves plan to keep Puerto Rico facility operational after hurricane trashed it

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) has approved a plan to keep the famous Arecibo Observatory running after it was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria.…

Whimsical mechanical creatures spring to life, tell stories - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 2:00pm
These absurdist sculptures of people and animals explore the intersection of art and engineering -- and tell playful little tales while they're at it.

Pandemic Legacy: Season 2—The world’s “best board game” gets better

Ars Technica - November 18, 2017 - 2:00pm

Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com.

How do you follow the most popular board game ever made?

In a world where three separate versions of Smurfs Monopoly exist, Pandemic Legacy: Season One (PL:S1) isn’t the biggest-selling game of all time—but it has topped the popularity charts at Board Game Geek since it was released. It’s as close to “universally loved” as it’s possible to get in this contrarian world.

Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

HomePod delay clouds Apple’s smart speaker future - CNET

cNET.com - News - November 18, 2017 - 2:00pm
Apple is ceding the key holiday shopping season to Google and Amazon.

Pentagon contractor leaves social media spy archive wide open on Amazon

Ars Technica - November 18, 2017 - 1:30pm

(credit: Wikipedia)

A Pentagon contractor left a vast archive of social-media posts on a publicly accessible Amazon account in what appears to be a military-sponsored intelligence-gathering operation that targeted people in the US and other parts of the world.

The three cloud-based storage buckets contained at least 1.8 billion scraped online posts spanning eight years, researchers from security firm UpGuard's Cyber Risk Team said in a blog post published Friday. The cache included many posts that appeared to be benign, and in many cases those involved from people in the US, a finding that raises privacy and civil-liberties questions. Facebook was one of the sites that originally hosted the scraped content. Other venues included soccer discussion groups and video game forums. Topics in the scraped content were extremely wide ranging and included Arabic language posts mocking ISIS and Pashto language comments made on the official Facebook page of Pakistani politician Imran Khan.

The scrapings were left in three Amazon Web Servers S3 cloud storage buckets that were configured to allow access to anyone with a freely available AWS account. It's only the latest trove of sensitive documents left unsecured on Amazon. In recent months, UpGuard has also found private data belonging to Viacom, security firm TigerSwan, and defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton similarly exposed. In Friday's post, UpGuard analyst Dan O'Sullivan wrote:

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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