Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News > RSS Newsfeeds > Categories

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Google search


Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
15%
200 - 500 GB
30%
500 - 800 GB
4%
800 - 1200 GB
4%
1200 - 1500 GB
11%
1500 - 2000 GB
15%
> 2000 GB
22%
Total votes: 27

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
Industry & Technology

SpaceX seeks to tie its record for most launches in a year on Thursday

Ars Technica - 21 min 31 sec ago

Enlarge / A Block 5 variant of the Falcon 9 rocket launches the Telstar 19 mission in July. (credit: Trevor Mahlmann)

In 2017, SpaceX finally answered critics of the company who said it had not delivered on the promise of a high flight rate for its low-cost launch program.

Prior to last year, the critics were not wrong—SpaceX had never successfully launched more than eight rockets in any given year. Finally, in 2017, it attempted 18 launches, and all made it safely into space. The SpaceX steamroller had arrived.

This year the company has had a lot on its plate. It flew the large Falcon Heavy rocket for the first time in February. It introduced a brand-new, potentially highly reusable variant of the Falcon 9 rocket in May. And all throughout the year, the company's engineers have been scrambling to finalize development of the Dragon spacecraft to meet NASA's needs to get its astronauts to the International Space Station.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Open mind, wide open throttle: We go to our first NASCAR race

Ars Technica - 31 min 46 sec ago

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty)

RICHMOND, Va.—Earlier this year, I took a long-overdue look at NASCAR. That deep dive into the technology busted stereotypes and preconceptions, but it really was only part of the NASCAR puzzle. In fact, I'd go so far as to say I ignored perhaps the most important aspect of the nation's most popular motorsport. This only really sank in a few weeks ago after I, at long last, went to Richmond Raceway to witness my first NASCAR race. Because the key to understanding NASCAR—at least to this observer—is simple: it's all about the spectacle.

This Sunday is the title-decider at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Florida. After 267 laps—400.5 miles if you're reading this in America, 644.5 km if you aren't—the 2018 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series (to give it its full name) will have a winner. The championship is now a four-way fight among Kyle Busch (Joe Gibbs Racing), Kevin Harvick (Stewart-Haas Racing), Joey Logano (Team Penske), and Martin Truex Jr. (Furniture Row Racing). NASCAR has moved to a playoff structure of late to ensure the championship goes down to the wire. So each of the four drivers enters the weekend with an equal shot: whoever finishes highest in the running order will be crowned champion. (What happens in the event of crashes and so on is explored by Alanis King here in much better depth than I could hope to provide.)

Martin Truex Jr. leads a pack of cars during the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Federated Auto Parts 400 at Richmond Raceway on September 22, 2018 in Richmond, Virginia. (credit: Robert Laberge/Getty Images)

Focusing just on the technology was an omission, but it was no error. I purposefully chose my off-season visit to North Carolina at the beginning of this year as my introduction to NASCAR. Ars is about technology, after all; visiting the sport at home, when things are quiet, meant we could focus on the technology without everything else that comes with being at a race weekend. Less danger of cultural tourism, too.

Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook accused of dark PR tactics

BBC Technology News - 35 min 41 sec ago
Facebook is embroiled in a new controversy over the tactics it used to discredit its critics.

Meet the people hacking their bodies for better sex - CNET

cNET.com - News - 50 min 21 sec ago
For a small, bold subset of "grinders," the next sexual revolution may come from supercharging the body, cyborg-style.

Mi 8 Pro: Xiaomi early buyers wait for modern firmware

The Register - 1 hour 6 min ago
Xiaomi your underpants: When will the UK market get its branded undies?

Prospective phone buyers may want to wait before plumping for a new Xiaomi. The newcomer’s flagship ships with MUIU 9 firmware, which is stuck on 2017’s Android Oreo.…

The Sphero Special Edition Battle Worn BB-8 and Force Band are just $40 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 6 min ago
The adorable little 'bot used to sell for $130 all by himself.

Comcast will let you watch Tubi TV like a cable channel - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 8 min ago
Like Netflix and YouTube before it, but this time with a start-up.

Get a one-year unlimited Red Pocket Mobile plan for $209 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 10 min ago
It's 10 Days of Deals, Day 9, and we're feeling fine with this exclusive one-day-only discount. Find out why this prepaid phone plan beats Mint Mobile's.

Facebook leaders ignored warnings, deflected blame as scandals mounted, report says - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 19 min ago
CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg "stumbled" as they grappled with a growing number of scandals, according to The New York Times.

Emerson Sensi Touch review: Sensi's smart touchscreen thermostat is oh so easy to use - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 1 hour 23 min ago
Emerson's touchscreen Sensi smart thermostat is easy to adjust and it works with Alexa, Google Assistant and Siri.

The best smart thermostats out there today - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 23 min ago
In search of a smart thermostat? Here are our favorites.

Hot tech toys for 2018 include robots... that poo? - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 23 min ago
You may find some surprises with this year’s popular tech toys for kids.

Lux Kono review: Kono Smart Thermostat looks luxe, is hard to adjust - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 1 hour 23 min ago
Lux's Kono is easier to control from the app or with voice commands than from the thermostat itself.

Quietly, Japan has established itself as a power in the aerospace industry

Ars Technica - 1 hour 23 min ago

Enlarge / An H-2B rocket is moved from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 2 at the Tanegashima facility in southern Japan. (credit: JAXA)

TOKYO—In early September, the island nation of Japan was doing Japan things. One day, Typhoon Jebi roared ashore near Osaka and Kobe, breaking historical wind records. Early the next morning in Tokyo, as thick clouds from Jebi’s outer bands raced overhead, an offshore earthquake rattled softly but perceptibly through the city.

The capital city’s skies remained a bleak gray a few hours later as we entered the headquarters of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in the city’s bustling Shinagawa area. Men in suits gestured us forward, bowing as we passed, down a corridor to an elevator. After riding up 27 floors to the top of the building, more men in suits ushered our group into a long, formal meeting room. Along one wall, a bank of windows looked to the southwest. From here, on a clear day, the iconic Mount Fuji dominates the distant horizon. But not this day.

A handful of reporters had been invited here to meet with the MHI's chief executive, Shunichi Miyanaga, or Miyanaga-san as he is known throughout this building and beyond. The firm had paid our not-inconsiderable travel expenses so that we might learn more about the industrial conglomerate’s various businesses and its long-range plans to remain globally competitive.

Read 55 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Razer Phone 2 review: A powerful gaming phone with a dash of flagship panache - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 1 hour 23 min ago
It improves on the original Razer Phone in almost every way, but its battery life and photo quality are disappointing, even after a software update.

Japanese cyber security minister 'doesn't know what a USB stick is'

The Register - 1 hour 49 min ago
Never uses computers because his peons do everything for him

In Blighty, we have former home secretary Amber "Necessary Hashtags" Rudd, but shockingly politicians' failure to grasp basic aspects of their brief is not limited to the UK.…

Japan's cyber-security minister has 'never used a computer'

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 15 min ago
Yoshitaka Sakurada is responsible for ensuring the 2020 Olympic Games are not hacked.

Creepy or super creepy? That is the question Mozilla's throwing at IoT Christmas pressies

The Register - 2 hours 21 min ago
'Tis the season to be tracked by your connected water bottle

The FREDI baby monitor has been ranked creepiest connected home gadget on offer this festive season in a survey by Mozilla.…

Facebook Messenger kicks off Unsend feature rollout - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 27 min ago
It's officially known as Remove.

Ford isn't winning the self-driving car race, but that's OK - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 46 min ago
Join us for a trip to Miami where Ford and Argo AI are demonstrating the current state of their self-driving cars. They're not ready for prime-time, but Ford CEO Jim Hackett is OK with that.

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 16:24.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com