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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
17%
500 - 800 GB
6%
800 - 1200 GB
6%
1200 - 1500 GB
17%
1500 - 2000 GB
17%
> 2000 GB
22%
Total votes: 18

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Industry & Technology

Yale Security Fail: 'Unexpected load' caused systems to crash, whacked our Smart Living Home app

The Register - 1 hour 34 min ago
All working now says biz. No, no, no, no, say customers, it is NOT!

An unspecified and “unexpected load” on its infrastructure broke the Smart Living Home app for a day, an apologetic Yale Security UK confirmed to customers yesterday - however the smell of failure still lingers today.…

Facebook hires former deputy PM Sir Nick Clegg

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 55 min ago
The former Liberal Democrat leader will head Facebook's global affairs and communications team.

Google to charge Android OEMs as much as $40 per phone in EU

Ars Technica - 2 hours 4 sec ago

Google's Building 44, where Android is developed. (credit: Ron Amadeo)

We're still seeing the fallout from the European Commission's $5 billion antitrust fine against Google. Earlier this week, Google announced it would comply with the ruling by unbundling the Google Android app package, allowing OEMs to skip Chrome and Google Search in favor of alternatives. The catch is that, since ad revenue from these Google services was used to support Android development, Google will start charging OEMs that license Google apps but choose the unbundled route.

Now, thanks to a report from The Verge, we're getting an idea of just how much this more flexible app licensing scheme will cost OEMs. Citing "confidential documents" that were shown to the site, The Verge says Google will charge OEMs as much as $40 per device if they don't use Google's preferred Android setup. The pricing is flexible based on the country and the pixel density of the device's screen. The EU is split into three tiers, with the UK, Sweden, Germany, Norway, and the Netherlands in the most expensive tier. Lower-end phones in bottom-tier countries can cost as little as $2.50 per device. Android tablets, if any of those still exist, get their own pricing tier that is even across all countries and caps out at $20. It all sounds very complicated, but if we imagine this pricing structure applied to the $720 Galaxy S9 sold in the UK, slapping on the top-end $40 fee works out to a 5.5 percent price increase and a $760 phone.

That's not the only spot in Android OEMs' wallets Google will hit. If OEMs don't pre-install Chrome, the report claims OEMs will no longer get a share of search revenue generated by Chrome users. The report says the new rules will kick in February 1, 2019, which is strange given that Google's new licensing rules from earlier in the week start at the end of the month.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook job not lobbying, says Sir Nick Clegg

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 1 min ago
Sir Nick Clegg talks about how he got his new Facebook job and what he will be doing for the social media giant.

Ars on your lunch break: Theaterwide biotoxic and chemical warfare

Ars Technica - 2 hours 4 min ago

Enlarge / "Mr. McKittrick, after very careful consideration, sir, I've come to the conclusion that your new defense system sucks." (credit: MGM/UA)

Today we’re presenting the fourth and final installment of my conversation with the outspoken author, podcaster, philosopher, and recovering neuroscientist Sam Harris. Please check out parts one, two, and three if you missed them. Otherwise, you can press play on the embedded audio player or pull up the transcript, both of which are below.

We open today’s conversation by talking about bioterrorism. Because that’s not uplifting enough, we then move on the dangers a super AI could present in certain worst-case scenarios (which was the topic of a popular TED talk of Harris'). This conversation builds on yesterday’s cheerful discussion of nuclear terrorism.

Click here for a transcript and click here for an MP3 direct download.

The final part of the podcast is a conversation between me and podcasting superstar Tom Merritt. In it, Merritt and I discuss my interview with Harris—as well as a chunk of my novel After On. This section exists because I originally thought my podcast would be a limited set of just eight episodes connected that novel. But the podcast acquired a life of its own, and I’m about to publish episode #38 in the series of eight.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Red Dead Redemption 2 really wants you to love your horse - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 8 min ago
Rockstar games is building a "deliberate and intimate" game world, where an outlaw's best friend is his trusty steed.

Listen to Marvel's Daredevil seasion 3 with these cryptic Instagram posts - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 14 min ago
The Daredevil clips give viewers a blind look at moments from the new season.

Wikileaks' Julian Assange sues Ecuador for violating his rights and freedoms - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 16 min ago
The Ecuadorian embassy reportedly threatened to take away Assange's cat.

New material could up efficiency of concentrated solar power

Ars Technica - 2 hours 27 min ago

Enlarge / A 110 megawatt (MW) solar plant in Israel’s Negev desert. (credit: OPIC)

With the price of photovoltaics having plunged dramatically, solar is likely to become a major contributor to the electrical generating mix in many countries. But the intermittent nature of photovoltaics could put a limit on how much they contribute to future grids or force us to develop massive storage capabilities.

But photovoltaics aren't the only solar technology out there. Concentrated solar power uses mirrors to focus the Sun's light, providing heat that can be used to drive turbines. Advances in heat storage mean that the technology can now generate power around the clock, essentially integrating storage into the process of producing energy. Unfortunately, the price of concentrated solar hasn't budged much, and photovoltaics have left it in the dust. But some materials scientists may have figured out a way to boost concentrated solar's efficiency considerably, clawing back some of photovoltaics' advantage.

Feel the heat

Solar thermal revolves around transfers of heat. Sunlight is used to heat up a working fluid at the mirrors' focus. That then transfers the heat either to a storage system or directly to another fluid that is used to drive a turbine—typically steam. Higher temperatures typically mean more work can be extracted, making the efficiency of these transfers critical.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

These $35 AirPod alternatives are way better than you'd expect - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 31 min ago
Cheapskate exclusive! Smart design, secure fit, great sound -- what more could you want? Plus: stock up on scary movies with Vudu's *killer* $4.99 deal. (Come on, you liked it.)

iPhone XR camera: Here’s how we think it will work - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 34 min ago
It's only got one lens, while the iPhone XS has two. But what else is different?

There's no 'I' in 'IMFT' – because Micron intends to buy Intel out of 3D XPoint joint venture

The Register - 2 hours 34 min ago
Chipzilla has to go it alone or turn to a partner

Micron has announced its intent to buy out Intel's interest in Intel Micron Flash Technologies (IMFT), the pair's flash and 3D XPoint foundry joint venture.…

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 review: War games, now with battle royale!

Ars Technica - 2 hours 39 min ago

Enlarge / Players duking it out in the new Blackout mode.

Call of Duty, like video game war simulations in general, is caught in a paradox. It never changes, and yet, every year, it definitely does change. Approaching a new Call of Duty, especially from the multiplayer side, is a bit of a challenge. How much do the various iterative changes matter, and do they manage to reshape the core of the game in any meaningful way? Call of Duty has long been a game about moving fast and shooting guns; what makes the latest version worth playing over the dozen-plus iterations prior?

To be fair, Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 changes more than most. The highly choreographed, extravagantly cinematic single-player campaign that has been de rigueur for the series' entire lifespan has been excised. That leaves an awkward hole at the core of the experience, which developer Treyarch has filled with Blackout, an 88- to 100-player battle royale mode in the vein of Fortnite or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. The rest of the game modes—the standard-by-now multiplayer suite and the ridiculous but addictive Zombies mode—fall in line around Blackout, creating a three-tiered experience of hyper-violence and militaristic energy.

Black Ops 4 is the biggest single-game change for the Call of Duty franchise in ages. But it's still, when it comes right down to it, just another Call of Duty.

“Where we droppin’, soldier?”

Black Ops 4 doesn't present its content in any particular order. As a player, you can jump freely between its three modes, and nothing—except for player progression in each mode—is gated from the start. The natural place to start, though, is Blackout, the newest part of the Call of Duty package, both the most derivative and the most distinct mode on offer. Taking place on a sprawling map stitched together from locations and motifs in Call of Duty's multiplayer past, Blackout heavily resembles just about any other battle royale game, both in concept and execution.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ford Ranger Raptor remains a no-go in the US - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 44 min ago
Ford has more than one reason to deny us this midsize monster truck.

Google Pixel 3 review: Google pairs an amazing camera with serious AI smarts - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 2 hours 45 min ago
The Pixel 3's camera already makes it a standout -- but useful Google software elevates the phone even more.

Twitter reportedly removes pro-Saudi bots after Jamal Khashoggi disappearance - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 47 min ago
NBC News gave the social network a list of suspected bot accounts.

iPhone XS specs vs. XS Max, XR, X: What's new and different - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 16 min ago
See how Apple's new 2018 iPhones compare spec-by-spec with last year's iPhone X.

USB-C Apple Watch Magnetic Charger quietly debuts in store - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 17 min ago
Just in time to coincide with the Apple Watch Series 4.

Two orbiters begin their long journey to Mercury Friday night

Ars Technica - 3 hours 23 min ago

ESA

One might think it's a relatively easy thing to reach Mercury, the innermost planet in the Solar System. At its closest approach, Mercury is just 77 million kilometers from Earth, or not all that much farther than the closest that Earth comes to Mars. The Earth-Mars transit typically only takes about six months.

However, the Sun's enormous gravity makes putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mercury quite difficult. How much gravity are we talking about? The g-force at the surface of the Earth is 9.8 meters/second^2. By comparison, the Sun's gravity is nearly 30 times greater, at 274 m/s^2.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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