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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
18%
500 - 800 GB
6%
800 - 1200 GB
6%
1200 - 1500 GB
12%
1500 - 2000 GB
18%
> 2000 GB
24%
Total votes: 17

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Industry & Technology

The strangest Black Friday deals of all time - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:57pm
From brainwave-controlled cat ears to a USS Enterprise sushi set, these weird Amazon Black Friday sales are way better than a discount TV.

iPhone XR: Why the cheapest 2018 iPhone might be the one you want - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - October 17, 2018 - 8:53pm
Apple's most colorful iPhone X is also its most affordable 2018 model.

How Venom's visual effects goo stuck to Tom Hardy - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:49pm
It wasn't easy to get that goo where it needed to go. Venom's VFX supervisor, Paul J. Franklin, explains it all for you.

Hulu releases a Night Mode that's easy on the eyes - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:41pm
The TV streamer is adding a dark theme to its web experience.

Report: Former top Waymo engineer altered code to go on “forbidden routes”

Ars Technica - October 17, 2018 - 8:34pm

Enlarge (credit: Caitlin O'Hara/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

In the early days of what ultimately became Waymo, Google’s self-driving car division (known at the time as "Project Chauffeur"), there were "more than a dozen accidents, at least three of which were serious," according to a new article in The New Yorker.

The magazine profiled Anthony Levandowski, the former Google engineer who was at the center of the Waymo v. Uber trade secrets lawsuit. According to the article, back in 2011, Levandowski also modified the autonomous software to take the prototype Priuses on "otherwise forbidden routes."

Citing an anonymous source, The New Yorker reports that Levandowski sat behind the wheel as the safety driver, along with Isaac Taylor, a Google executive. But while they were in the car, the Prius "accidentally boxed in another vehicle," a Camry.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The Kid Who Would Be King movie trailer needs more Patrick Stewart - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:33pm
This kid-friendly version of the King Arthur legend promises Picard, but the preview doesn't deliver.

Iconic Abrams tank gets a high-tech upgrade - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:29pm
The M1 Abrams is one of the most formidable vehicles in military history, and a new generation is on the way with massive tech upgrades.

VW's next matrix lights could project information onto the road - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:21pm
The so-called HD-LCD headlights are being tested now.

Facebook accused of misleading advertisers, then trying to hide it - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 8:17pm
A lawsuit says the social network knew about the inflated metrics long before admitting it.

The Red Hydrogen One is out this week: Here's everything you need to know - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - October 17, 2018 - 8:14pm
Preorders for the phone with a 3D screen start shipping Oct. 18.

LuminosityLink spyware mastermind gets 30 months in the clink, forfeits $725k in Bitcoin

The Register - October 17, 2018 - 7:57pm
Grubby Grubbs' grifting days are gone

A programmer who wrote and sold software that backdoored PCs so they could be remotely controlled has been jailed for 30 months – and forced to give up his stash of 114 Bitcoins.…

You can now buy a 1,000-hp Camaro from your Chevrolet dealer - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:57pm
How would you like a supercharged 6.8-liter V8 in your Camaro?

Spotify for Wear OS lets you play music from your wrist - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:54pm
The biggest music-streaming service comes to smartwatches running on Google's software.

Uber brings app safety features to more drivers and riders - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:54pm
The Safety Toolkit is heading to two dozen countries.

Chrome 70 makes auto-login optional following pressure over privacy - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:46pm
The new browser also has better web apps, fingerprint authentication and AV1 video.

We break down what 5G will really be like (The 3:59, Ep. 475) - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:39pm
Spoiler: Not so great out the gate. Also: How Pixel 3's camera stacks up, and Netflix's earnings.

New shows and movies on Hulu: November 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:35pm
The Big Lebowski, Married With Children, and a bonanza of Bond films.

Well slap my ass and call me Judy, Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 is just as hard to fix as the old one

The Register - October 17, 2018 - 7:34pm
So. Much. Glue.

Torx twirlers iFixit celebrated the release of Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 by ripping the thing apart only to find that its still pretty much unrepairable.…

How did Easter Islanders survive without wells or streams?

Ars Technica - October 17, 2018 - 7:25pm

Enlarge / A freshwater seep in the tidal zone near Tongariki. (credit: Brosnan et al. 2018)

Archaeologists are piecing together more details about how the Rapanui people once erected the formerly enigmatic stone statues, or moai. But one of the island’s lingering mysteries is how the Rapanui found enough water to sustain thousands of people on a small island. Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has no permanent streams, and its three lakes are hard to reach and far from archaeological evidence of settlement. But when European colonists arrived in the late 1700s, thousands of people already lived on the island, and they had to be getting their drinking water somewhere.

According to geoscientist Tanya Brosnan of California State University, the Rapanui probably got at least some of their drinking water from places along the coast where fresh groundwater seeped out of the island’s bedrock and into the sea. The resulting mixture would have been brackish but safe to drink, and it could have sustained populations of thousands on an island with few other reliable sources of fresh water. That’s common knowledge among the modern Rapanui people, but it hasn’t been clear that pre-contact people got their water the same way.

“Our work was certainly not ‘discovering’ anything that people didn’t already know about. Rather, we worked to put together an overall picture of groundwater and its accessibility for past populations,” Binghamton University archaeologist Carl Lipo, a coauthor on the study, told Ars.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Audi R8 V10 Plus Competition package is limited to just 10 cars - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - October 17, 2018 - 7:24pm
Less weight, more downforce and more exclusivity.

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