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Industry & Technology

Scientists think they’ve solved one mystery of Easter Island’s statues

Ars Technica - 47 min 52 sec ago

Enlarge / Moai statues in a row, Ahu Tongariki, Easter Island, Chile. (credit: De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images)

Chile's Easter Island (Rapa Nui) is famous for its giant monumental statues, called moai, built by early inhabitants some 800 years ago. The islanders likely chose the statues' locations based on the availability of fresh water sources, according to a recent paper in PLOS One.

Scholars have puzzled over the moai on Easter Island for decades, pondering their cultural significance, as well as how a Stone Age culture managed to carve and transport statues weighing as much as 92 tons. They were typically mounted on platforms called ahu. According to co-author Carl Lipo, an anthropologist at Binghamton University, you can have ahu (platforms) without moai (statues) and moai without ahu, usually along the roads leading to ahu; they were likely being transported and never got to their destination.

Back in 2012, Lipo and his colleague, Terry Hunt of the University of Arizona, showed that you could transport a ten-foot, five-ton moai a few hundred yards with just 18 people and three strong ropes by employing a rocking motion. Last year Lipo proposed an intriguing hypothesis for how the islanders placed red hats on top of some moai; those can weigh up to 13 tons. He suggested the inhabitants used ropes to roll the hats up a ramp.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google tries to reassure gamers about Stadia speed and latency concerns

Ars Technica - 1 hour 2 min ago

SAN FRANCISCO—Google's Phil Harrison tells Ars that Stadia game streaming should provide a smooth, full-resolution experience on Internet connections above a threshold of 20 to 30mbps, a level that should allow for "hundreds of millions of potential players in the markets that we're talking about."

While the company set a threshold of 25mbps for its beta testing late last year, Harrison told Ars that "in actual fact, we only use an average of 20mbps; it obviously bounces up and down depending on the scene." Since that beta, Harrison said infrastructure and codec improvements "now allow us to get up to 4K resolution [at 60 frames per second] within about 30mbps. So we saw a dramatic increase in quality between then and now without a significant increase in bandwidth."

Even at that threshold, Harrison acknowledges that "I know [Stadia] won't reach everybody [and] I respect that some people will be frustrated by that. But I suspect that some of those people don't get a great YouTube experience, they might get a good Netflix experience today. The good news is the Internet continues to grow in quality and reach. So there is a bit of a rising tide that lifts all boats, with 5G potentially helping that equation in the future. That's a little bit over the horizon today, but it's I think going to come into view pretty quickly."

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

'Cancel Brexit' petition passes 1m signatures on Parliament site

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 8 min ago
A call to revoke Article 50 generates the fastest ever rate of signatures on Parliament's website.

T-Mobile’s $50 home Internet service has no data cap, but plenty of limits

Ars Technica - 1 hour 24 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg)

T-Mobile today said it is starting "an invitation-only pilot for in-home Internet service on LTE" and will connect up to 50,000 homes this year in rural and underserved parts of the country. It will cost $50 a month.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere said his company plans to "take the fight to Big Cable on behalf of consumers and offer real choice, competition and savings to Americans nationwide.”

Invitations for the home service will go out this week by email and US mail to current T-Mobile wireless customers in "select areas," which T-Mobile did not identify in its announcement.

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Starship tests in South Texas will be broadcast, but temper your expectations

Ars Technica - 1 hour 42 min ago

Enlarge / The Starship test vehicle, currently under assembly in South Texas, may look similar to this illustration when finished. (credit: Elon Musk/Twitter)

What a world we live in. As SpaceX gears up to begin preliminary testing of its Starship vehicle along the South Texas coast, nearby South Padre Island has set up a camera to broadcast the proceedings. More than 2,700 people were watching as of 11:30am ET Thursday.

It's a clever tourism marketing ploy for the island but also great for spaceflight fans to get unprecedented views of real-time testing.

With that said, it's worth tempering expectations at least for the next few weeks. For now, SpaceX has attached a single Raptor engine to the test vehicle—which is nicknamed Starhopper because it was designed to make "hop" tests to varying altitudes to test Starship's landing capabilities. Eventually Starhopper will have three engines on the vehicle.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Microsoft ships antivirus for macOS as Windows Defender becomes Microsoft Defender

Ars Technica - 1 hour 54 min ago

Microsoft is bringing its Windows Defender anti-malware application to macOS—and more platforms in the future—as it expands the reach of its Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) platform. To reflect the new cross-platform nature, the suite is also being renamed to Microsoft Defender ATP, with the individual clients being labelled "for Mac" or "for Windows."

Microsoft Defender ATP for Mac will initially focus on traditional signature-based malware scanning.

macOS malware is still something of a rarity, but it's not completely unheard of. Ransomware for the platform was found in 2016, and in-the-wild outbreaks of other malicious software continue to be found. Apple has integrated some malware protection into macOS, but we've heard from developers on the platform that Mac users aren't always very good at keeping their systems on the latest point release. This situation is particularly acute in corporate environments; while Windows has a range of tools to ensure that systems are kept up-to-date and alert administrators if they fall behind, a similar ecosystem hasn't been developed for macOS.

One would hope that Defender for Mac will also trap Windows malware to prevent Mac users from spreading malware to their Windows colleagues.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Oculus releases updated Rift VR headset

BBC Technology News - 2 hours 39 min ago
The updated flagship headset has sharper displays but still needs to be tethered to a PC to work.

Health apps pose 'unprecedented' privacy risks

BBC Technology News - 3 hours 51 min ago
Data is being shared with companies, including Amazon and Google, a study of popular apps finds.

Christchurch shootings: 'Bad actors' helped attack videos spread online

BBC Technology News - 5 hours 47 min ago
Edited clips were continually uploaded to help defeat automatic detection systems, says Facebook

Photographer loses lawsuit over use of her photo in political mailer

Ars Technica - 7 hours 22 min ago

Enlarge / An image from the RNC flyer. We're quite sure that our use of this image is fair, since we're engaging in comment and criticism about this photo and its role in the lawsuit. (credit: RNC / Erika Peterman)

When Erika Peterman saw photographs she had taken in a flyer put out by the Republican National Committee, she wasn't happy about it. Peterman was a supporter of Rob Quist, the Democratic candidate for Montana's at-large seat in Congress in the 2017 special election. The Montana Democratic Party had hired Peterman to take photographs of Quist at a Democratic Party event. The photographs showed Quist wearing a cowboy hat and holding a guitar.

The RNC had downloaded three of the photos from Quist's campaign Facebook page and used them in a campaign mailer attacking Quist. Peterman sued the Republican Party, arguing that the mailer infringed her copyright. But in a February ruling, a federal judge rejected Peterman's arguments, ruling that the Republicans' use of her image was fair use.

"The mailer uses Quist's musicianship to criticize his candidacy, subverting the purpose and function" of Peterman's original photographs, Judge Dana Christensen wrote. Her ruling noted that Peterman had charged the Montana Democrats a flat $500 to cover the event and had published the photographs on social media, suggesting that she had no expectation of making further money from them.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

George the Poet: Social media gives poets 'a fair shot'

BBC Technology News - 13 hours 56 min ago
George the Poet says social media propelled his career and made poetry more accessible.

It’s been a long wait, but Bill and Ted 3: Face the Music is happening

Ars Technica - 17 hours 57 min ago

"Be excellent!" Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves reprise their iconic roles next summer in Bill and Ted 3: Face the Music.

John Wick 3 isn't even out yet, but Keanu Reeves is already onto his next project, reprising another of his iconic roles: a third film in the Bill and Ted franchise that has long been desired by fans. And it has been announced via Twitter in a quintessentially Bill and Ted way: with stars Alex Winter and Reeves—collectively Wyld Stallyns (the name of their band)—standing in front of the bandshell at the Hollywood Bowl ("where we will never play") and thanking fans for their support.

The third film will be called Bill and Ted 3: Face the Music, and it will hit theaters August 21, 2020, if the Bill and Ted 3 Twitter account is accurate. Naturally, time travel will be involved. Per an accompanying press release:

Following 1989's Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure and 1991's Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, the stakes are higher than ever for William "Bill" S. Preston Esq. (Winter) and Theodore "Ted" Logan (Reeves). Yet to fulfill their rock-and-roll destiny, the now middle-aged best friends set out on a new adventure, when a visitor from the future warns them that only their song can save life as we know it and bring harmony to the universe. Along the way, they will be helped by their families, old friends, and a few music legends.

The film will be directed by Dean Parisot of Galaxy Quest and will reunite the screenwriters of the two previous films, Ed Solomon and Chris Matheson (who is incidentally the son of I Am Legend scribe Richard Matheson).

Read on Ars Technica | Comments

AT&T and Comcast claim “anti-robocalling milestone” with new Caller ID tech

Ars Technica - March 20, 2019 - 11:10pm

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg)

AT&T and Comcast today said they have completed a successful cross-network test of a new Caller ID authentication system, and they plan to roll out the technology to consumers later this year.

AT&T and Comcast are among the phone providers implementing the new "SHAKEN" and "STIR" protocols, which use digital certificates to verify that Caller ID numbers aren't being spoofed.

Today's AT&T/Comcast announcement said the carriers completed "an exchange of authenticated calls between two separate providers' voice networks that is believed to be the nation's first." They called the test an "anti-robocalling fraud milestone."

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Hotel guests 'secretly filmed and live-streamed'

BBC Technology News - March 20, 2019 - 10:53pm
Spy cameras hidden in hotel rooms in South Korea live-streamed footage to the web, police say.

Korea spycam porn: 1,600 fall victim and four men arrested

BBC Technology News - March 20, 2019 - 10:44pm
Four men allegedly filmed 1,600 guests in 30 South Korean hotels and sold the footage online.

The Air Force will soon take bids for mid-2020s launches. It’s controversial

Ars Technica - March 20, 2019 - 10:09pm

Enlarge / A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy lifts the NROL-71 payload on Jan. 19, 2019. (credit: United Launch Alliance)

Within the next 10 days, the US Air Force may issue an opportunity for rocket companies to bid on contracts for about 25 launches between 2022 and 2026. Although a “request for proposals” may not sound all that provocative, this particular government solicitation is filled with intrigue—and will have major implications for all of the big US rocket companies.

At present, United Launch Alliance (ULA) and SpaceX launch rockets for the Air Force, lofting powerful spy cameras, communication satellites and other sensitive payloads into various orbits for the government. In recent years, the military has sought to modernize its contractor base for the coming decade, encouraging new launch competitors and new ideas. This forthcoming solicitation for launch contracts in the mid-2020s, however, may effectively end that effort.

It was only five months ago, in October, that the Air Force announced $2.25 billion in “Launch Services Agreements” to be split among ULA (Vulcan rocket), Northrop Grumman (Omega), and Blue Origin (New Glenn). The funds were provided so that each of those companies could develop large, modern rockets and build the launch facilities needed to support military payloads. Over the first year of those awards, each company will receive the first $181 million of their individual awards. (SpaceX, somewhat controversially, did not receive an award. This is partly because the Air Force believes the company's Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets can meet its needs.)

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Windows 10 version 1903 heads for the finish line

Ars Technica - March 20, 2019 - 9:26pm

Enlarge / Who doesn't love some new Windows? (credit: Peter Bright / Flickr)

It's clear that Microsoft is in the very final stages of development of Windows 10 version 1903, the April 2019 Update. The fast distribution ring has seen two builds arrive this week after two last week, bringing with them no new features but a slowly whittled-down bug list following the development pattern we've seen in previous updates. In the past, the company has tried to release Windows 10 feature upgrades on Patch Tuesday, the second Tuesday of each month, meaning there's just under three weeks left to go.

A little alarmingly, a couple of long-standing issues with the release still appear to be unresolved. A green-screen-of-death error caused when games with BattlEye anti-cheat software are used has been a feature of the 1903 previews for many months, and Microsoft is still listing it as unresolved. The scope and impact of this bug was so significant that the slow distribution ring didn't receive a preview of 1903 for much of its development process; Microsoft felt that it was too likely to affect too many people to be usable. This is eminently plausible, as BattlEye is used by PUBG and Fortnite, among other games. The company finally relented in February, pushing out a new build on the slow ring but blacklisting any systems with the offending third-party software.

The bug was first listed as a known issue with build 18298, released on December 10 last year. Microsoft says it's working with BattlEye to resolve the problem, but there has been no visible progress so far. BattlEye boasts of using a kernel-mode component as part of its anti-cheat software. Running in the kernel means that it's harder for cheat software to hide from or otherwise interfere with what BattlEye does, but with this comes the temptation to mess with operating system data structures and functions that aren't documented, which then leads to system crashes when the operating system is updated.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Cable lobby seeks better reputation by dropping “cable” from its name

Ars Technica - March 20, 2019 - 8:59pm

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | DonNichols)

Cable lobbyists don't want to be called cable lobbyists anymore. The nation's top two cable industry lobby groups have both dropped the word "cable" from their names. But the lobby groups' core mission—the fight against regulation of cable networks—remains unchanged.

The National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) got things started in 2016 when it renamed itself NCTA-The Internet & Television Association, keeping the initialism but dropping the words it stood for. The group was also known as the National Cable Television Association between 1968 and 2001.

The American Cable Association (ACA) is the nation's other major cable lobby. While NCTA represents the biggest companies like Comcast and Charter, the ACA represents small and mid-size cable operators. Today, the ACA announced that it is now called America's Communications Association or "ACA Connects," though the ACA's website still uses the americancable.org domain name.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

US mum 'abused kids who performed on family YouTube channel'

BBC Technology News - March 20, 2019 - 8:15pm
The woman, whose children performed on the Fantastic Adventures channel, denies charges of child abuse.

Judge orders government to redo climate analysis on Wyoming oil leases

Ars Technica - March 20, 2019 - 7:51pm

Enlarge / A natural gas facility stands on the Pinedale Anticline on May 3, 2018 in Pinedale, Wyoming. (Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images)

On Tuesday, a federal judge wrote that the Department of the Interior must complete a thorough climate change analysis when considering leasing public land for oil and gas extraction.

The opinion included an order to halt all new oil and gas leases on more than 300,000 acres of publicly managed land in Wyoming until the DOI's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) can complete a proper review.

The case was initially brought in 2016 in the US District Court for the District of Columbia against former President Barack Obama's DOI. The plaintiffs, WildEarth Guardians and Physicians for Social Responsibility, argued that the DOI made oil and gas lease sales in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming without taking into account the "direct, indirect, and cumulative" impacts to the climate that drilling would have.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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