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Poll
For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
36%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
36%
Manual into existing VRC
7%
Manual into new VRC
20%
Total votes: 44

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Reference Content

 
Industry & Technology

The $300 system in the fight against illegal images

BBC Technology News - 50 min 21 sec ago
The owner of an image hosting platform is fighting back against illegal material with a low-budget solution.

Amazon Echo comes to Marriott hotels

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 8 min ago
Marriott says digital assistant Alexa will be installed in some of its US properties.

Air Force tests two turboprops as potential A-10 “replacements”

Ars Technica - 1 hour 33 min ago

(video link)

The US Air Force has kicked off the procurement for another round of wing replacements for A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft, known affectionately by many as the Warthog. With new wings, the A-10s will help fill a gap left by the delayed volume delivery of F-35A fighters, which were intended to take over the A-10's close air support (CAS) role in "contested environments"—places where enemy aircraft or modern air defenses would pose a threat to supporting aircraft. For now, the A-10 is being used largely in uncontested environments, where the greatest danger pilots face is small arms fire or possibly a Stinger-like man-portable air defense system (MANPADS) missile. But the Warthog is also being deployed to Eastern Europe as part of the NATO show of strength in response to Russia.

While the A-10 will keep flying through 2025 under current plans, Air Force leadership has perceived (or was perhaps convinced to see) a need for an aircraft that could take over the A-10's role in low-intensity and uncontested environments—something relatively inexpensive and easy to maintain that could be flown from relatively unimproved airfields to conduct armed reconnaissance, interdiction, and close air support missions. The replacement would also double as advanced trainer aircraft for performing weapons qualifications and keeping pilots' flight-time numbers up.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm kicks crisis meeting into long grass

The Register - 1 hour 38 min ago
2-week delay on vote to dismiss current directors

A key shareholders' meeting has been adjourned, prolonging the Retro Computers Ltd ZX Spectrum Vega+ saga for another fortnight.…

Um, excuse me. Do you have clearance to patch that MRI scanner?

The Register - 2 hours 18 min ago
Healthcare regulations working against cybersecurity, claims expert

Israel Cyber Week Healthcare regulations oblige medical equipment vendors to focus on developing the next generation of technologies rather than addressing current cybersecurity issues, according to experts presenting at the eighth Israel Cyber Week.…

Hackers who sabotaged the Olympic games return for more mischief

Ars Technica - 2 hours 37 min ago

Enlarge (credit: National Archives Archeological Site)

The advanced hacking group that sabotaged the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in February has struck again, this time in attacks that targeted financial institutions in Russia and chemical- and biological-threat prevention labs in France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Ukraine, researchers said.

The new campaigns began last month with spear-phishing emails that were designed to infect targeted companies with malware that collected detailed information about their computers and networks. One of the malicious Word documents referred to Spiez Convergence, a biochemical threat conference that’s organized by the Spiez Laboratory, which played a key role in the investigation of the poisoning in March of a former Russian spy in the UK. UK government officials have said Russia was behind the poisoning. A second document targeted health and veterinary control authorities in Ukraine.

Researchers from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab said that documents in the phishing emails closely resemble those used to infect organizers, suppliers, and partners of the Winter Olympic Games in the months preceding the February Pyeongchang attack. These initial infections allowed the attackers to spend months developing detailed knowledge of the networks supporting the games. One of the key reasons the malware dubbed Olympic Destroyer was so successful in disrupting the Olympics was it used this knowledge to sabotage the networks. The discovery of a new phishing campaign by the same group raises the possibility they are intended to support new sabotage hacks.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Amazon’s Alexa for Hospitality handles checkout, pool time and more - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 37 min ago
The tech giant's newest version of its popular voice assistant was made specifically for hoteliers.

Capita admits it won't make money on botched NHS England contract

The Register - 3 hours 1 min ago
Outsourcer's mea culpa: firm failed on due diligence, lacked data, closed offices too fast

Embattled outsourcing giant Capita has made a loss of £140m trying to deliver on a seven-year contract to upgrade back-office support in the NHS – and never expects to turn a profit on it.…

Tesla chief Elon Musk accuses worker of sabotage

BBC Technology News - 3 hours 9 min ago
Tesla chief Elon Musk says an employee carried out "extensive and damaging sabotage".

New shuttle to drive South Australia around town on its own - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 22 min ago
The self-driving electric shuttle will first provide first- and last-mile solutions to the public before adding more routes to its services.

Rare manta ray nursery uncovered in Texas - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 31 min ago
No one thought to find out why there are more baby rays swimming in the area than elsewhere previously.

Adobe’s e-signature service to go bi-cloud: Adds Azure to AWS

The Register - 4 hours 13 min ago
Why? Well Adobe has just revealed deeper hooks into Office and Dynamics

Adobe is taking its “Sign” electronic signature service into Microsoft’s Azure cloud, in addition to its current arrangement that sees the service run in Amazon’s cloud.…

Man who allegedly gave Vault 7 cache to WikiLeaks busted by poor opsec

Ars Technica - 4 hours 29 min ago

Enlarge / A man crosses the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) seal in the lobby of CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, on August 14, 2008. (credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

A federal grand jury has formally indicted Joshua Adam Schulte, a former CIA employee, who prosecutors say was behind the Vault 7 trove of the agency’s hacking tools, which were sent to WikiLeaks.

Schulte, who had previously been prosecuted for possession of child pornography, has been expected to be indicted on the leaking charges for some time now. The New York-based engineer was arrested in August 2017.

According to the new superseding indictment, which was made public on Monday, Schulte faces numerous charges, including illegal gathering of national defense information, transmission of this information, obstruction of justice, among others.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

National ID cards might not mean much when up against incompetence of the UK Home Office

The Register - 4 hours 30 min ago
Would they have prevented Windrush? The mind boggles

The Windrush immigration papers scandal barred Caribbean-born Britons from public services and in some cases deported them because they lacked sufficient documentation.…

Pass gets a fail: Simple Password Store suffers GnuPG spoofing bug

The Register - 5 hours 7 min ago
Brinkmann files third signature spoof vulnerability in a month

Security researcher Marcus Brinkmann has turned up another vulnerability in the GnuPG cryptographic library, this time specific to the Simple Password Store.…

How to stealthily poison neural network chips in the supply chain

The Register - 5 hours 34 min ago
Your free guide to trick an AI classifier into thinking an umbrella is the Bolivian navy on maneuvers in the south pacific

Computer boffins have devised a potential hardware-based Trojan attack on neural network models that could be used to alter system output without detection.…

Apple fined $6.8M in Australia after Error 53 controversy - CNET

cNET.com - News - 6 hours ago
One undercover investigation and a year of court proceedings later, Australia takes an AU$9 million bite out of Apple.

And that is definitively that ... for now. 5G's carrier features frozen

The Register - 6 hours 7 min ago
Still to come: standards for stuff like IoT that non-carriers care about

Meta-standards group the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) last week rubber-stamped the first "frozen" 5G standards.…

Huawei issues open letter to Australia over security concerns - CNET

cNET.com - News - 6 hours 12 min ago
The Chinese telecom giant hits back over criticism that it poses a security risk for Australia's 5G roll-out.

Black Panther star wins hero award, and honors a real hero - CNET

cNET.com - News - 6 hours 27 min ago
Chadwick Boseman won MTV's best hero award, and celebrated James Shaw Jr., who saved lives in the Waffle House shooting.

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