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Poll
For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
37%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
37%
Manual into existing VRC
5%
Manual into new VRC
21%
Total votes: 43

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Industry & Technology

Google Doodle celebrates Abraham Ortelius' atlas - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 6:15pm
The Flemish cartographer was the first to suggest the world's continents were joined together before drifting apart.

Chewbacca sits courtside at Cleveland Cavaliers game - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 6:06pm
Hey, why's a 7-foot-tall Wookiee blocking my view of LeBron James?

Missed the royal wedding? Replay it in seconds - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Scan these GIFs for a super quick recap of the day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle became husband and wife in Windsor, England.

Elon Musk tweet-announces a $78,000 performance Model 3 with all-wheel drive

Ars Technica - May 20, 2018 - 5:55pm

Enlarge / WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 26: Tesla's new Model 3 car on display is seen on Friday, January 26, 2018, at the Tesla store in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images)

On Saturday night, Tesla CEO Elon Musk made a few announcements via Twitter about new options for the Tesla Model 3. Specifically, the CEO said that in July the Model 3 would be available with options for a dual-motor and all-wheel drive. On a normal Model 3, that addition will come at a cost of $5,000.

Cost of normal dual motor AWD option is $5k. Range is also 310 miles. Takes 0-60mph to 4.5 sec & top speed to 140 mph.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) May 20, 2018

Musk also announced a "performance" Model 3, which will also have dual-motor, all-wheel drive. That model will cost $78,000. What you get for all that extra cash will be the ability to go 0 to 60 miles per hour in 3.5 seconds, with 155mph top speed and at a range of 310 miles. "Cost of all options, wheels, paint, etc is included (apart from Autopilot)," Musk tweeted.

In 2016, Tesla announced similar upgrades for the Model S and Model X in the P100D version. The Model S P100D offered 0 to 60 in 2.5 seconds and a 315-mile range. The Model X had a similar option available, though the heavier car went from 0 to 60 in 2.9 seconds and had a 289-mile range. Upgrading those already-pricy cars cost $10,000 at the time. In November 2017, Tesla announced a new Roadster that it says will take 1.9 seconds to go from 0 to 60 miles per hour, with a 620-mile range. That performance vehicle has yet to make it to production.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New internet laws pledged as social media firms snub talks

BBC Technology News - May 20, 2018 - 3:26pm
Only four of 14 firms invited for talks turned up, culture secretary admits, as he pledges new laws.

Small group of iOS devs form “The Developers Union” to request App Store changes

Ars Technica - May 20, 2018 - 2:15pm

Enlarge (credit: Apple)

A small group of developers for Apple platforms has banded together to request new features and policies from Apple, and its members say they have ideas for ways to make it easier to make a living on the platform, Wired reports. They're calling it "The Developers Union," and they launched a website where devs can sign up to share their support of a free trial feature for the app store.

The union has some notable names attached, including Jake Schumacher, director of the documentary App: The Human Story, and NetNewsWire and MarsEdit developer Brent Simmons—along with a product designer named Loren Morris and a software developer named Roger Ogden.

The group says it will start with the free trial push but that it will follow that up with "other community-driven, developer-friendly changes" including a "a more reasonable revenue cut." The starting revenue share is 70-30 in the developers’ favor, presently. Google offers a similar rate, but Microsoft recently announced a cut to its share of revenue to developers' favor.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Best mobile games of 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 1:30pm
Looking for a new game to play on your phone or tablet? Here are our picks of the best mobile games.

Who Is Arthur Chu?: When Jeopardy ended, the real puzzles of online life began

Ars Technica - May 20, 2018 - 1:17pm

Trailer for Who Is Arthur Chu?

Some 50-plus years in, Jeopardy’s cultural impact seems definitive. The iconic game show has fans of all sorts: Drake listeners, scholars of classic cinema, local-pub-trivia diehards. It can turn “a software engineer from Salt Lake City” into author/TV personality/quizmaster Ken Jennings or “a bartender from New York” into your parents’ favorite contestant in recent memory.

But not all of the legendary quiz show’s champions enjoy universal adoration, and new documentary Who Is Arthur Chu?debuting on PBS’ America ReFramed this Tuesday, May 22, and available via VOD on June 12 across platforms (including iTunes, YouTube, Google Play, and Amazon)—looks at this oddly controversial contestant’s first year after becoming an 11-time Jeopardy champion in 2014. If you recognize the name today, it’s likely you’re a Jeopardy diehard with some sort of feeling about Chu’s unusual “Forrest Bounce” strategy, which essentially eschewed going top-down on categories in favor of hunting out Daily Doubles in order to limit an opponent’s big-play ability. The approach seemed to anger the game’s purists and make Chu divisive to the show’s fan community, but that’s a subject destined to be the starting point for some other film.

Who Is Arthur Chu? instead stumbles into a more interesting reality. Post-Jeopardy, Chu had no interest in resting on his new reputation and embracing the trivia lifestyle—rather, he decided to capitalize on his newfound fame and following by using it to fight back against online trolling and hate campaigns in the era of GamerGate and incels. Filmmakers Yu Gu and Scott Drucker, therefore, don’t end up with a behind-the-scenes look at Trebek’s temple; Who Is Arthur Chu? goes on to ask questions that are too complex for even Final Jeopardy.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The 49 best iPhone games - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 1:00pm
If you're all about the iPhone, these are some of the best games you can play.

The 44 best Android games of 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 12:30pm
These are unequivocally the best Android games on the planet.

Tomorrow's cities: Park with four seasons under one roof

BBC Technology News - May 20, 2018 - 3:13am
Four seasons park explores need for greener cities and looks at how climate change affects urban spaces.

Maker Faire captures the DIY spirit in art, science, music and robotics - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 12:15am
A climate of innovation, culture and education.

Our favorite car tech and luxury features of 2018 - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - May 20, 2018 - 12:14am
Roadshow's editors pick their favorite in-car luxury, convenience, infotainment and safety tech features.

Koss’ iconic Porta Pro headphone gets a Bluetooth model - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 19, 2018 - 7:17pm
The new Koss Porta Pro Wireless goes for not quite double the price of the wired model. Is it worth it?

Blunder burns unicorn attack that exploited Windows and Reader

Ars Technica - May 19, 2018 - 7:00pm

Enlarge (credit: Lisa Cooper / Flickr)

It’s not every day someone develops a malware attack that, with one click, exploits separate zero-day vulnerabilities in two widely different pieces of software. It’s even rarer that a careless mistake burns such a unicorn before it can be used. Researchers say that’s precisely happened to malicious PDF document designed to target unpatched vulnerabilities in both Adobe Reader and older versions of Microsoft Windows.

Modern applications typically contain “sandboxes” and other defenses that make it much harder for exploits to successfully execute malicious code on computers. When these protections work as intended, attacks that exploit buffer overflows and other common software vulnerabilities result in a simple application crash rather than a potentially catastrophic security event. The defenses require attackers to chain together two or more exploits: one executes malicious code, and a separate exploit allows the code to break out of the sandbox.

A security researcher from antivirus provider Eset recently found a PDF document that bypassed these protections when Reader ran on older Windows versions. It exploited a then-unpatched memory corruption vulnerability, known as a double free, in Reader that made it possible to gain a limited ability to read and write to memory. But to install programs, the PDF still needed a way to bypass the sandbox so that the code could run in more sensitive parts of the OS.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Samsung owes Apple $1B -- or maybe just $28M. OK, jury, what'll it be? - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 19, 2018 - 6:47pm
Either way, design patents are looking like a hot commodity in Silicon Valley as the jury starts deliberating.

Here’s a pint-size, yet feature-packed power amp from PS Audio - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 19, 2018 - 6:47pm
PS Audio revised their popular little integrated amp and rechristened it the Sprout 100.

More than 4M Samsung phones a year need service, court case reveals - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 19, 2018 - 6:17pm
Also, take a look at why Samsung started marketing phones on its own instead of leaving it to carriers.

FCC investigates site that let most US mobile phones’ location be exposed

Ars Technica - May 19, 2018 - 4:15pm

Enlarge / Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon), as seen on April 18, 2018. (credit: New America / Flickr)

The Federal Communications Commission has taken preliminary steps to examine the actions of LocationSmart, a southern California company that has suddenly found itself under intense public and government scrutiny for allowing most American cell phones’ locations to be easily accessed.

As Ars reported Thursday, LocationSmart identifies the locations of phones connected to AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon, often to an accuracy of a few hundred yards, reporter Brian Krebs said. While the firm claims it provides the location-lookup service only for legitimate and authorized purposes, Krebs reported that a demo tool on the LocationSmart website could be used by just about anyone to surreptitiously track the real-time whereabouts of just about anyone else.

"I can confirm the matter has been referred to the Enforcement Bureau," wrote FCC spokesman Neil Grace in a Friday afternoon email to Ars.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google Assistant 101: Get to know Google's voice-activated helper - CNET

cNET.com - News - May 19, 2018 - 4:00pm
What is Google Assistant? What can it do? How do you control it? Get caught up on Google's version of Siri or Alexa.

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