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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
14%
200 - 500 GB
32%
500 - 800 GB
4%
800 - 1200 GB
4%
1200 - 1500 GB
11%
1500 - 2000 GB
14%
> 2000 GB
21%
Total votes: 28

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Reference Content

 
Industry & Technology

IDG Contributor Network: Don’t let the shadows scare you

CIO.com - IT industry - August 8, 2017 - 3:12pm

If IT is the business, then it is the responsibility of everyone within an organization. Therefore, shadow IT no longer exists and there is no reason to be afraid. The future of the workplace is at stake as rapid advancements in technology are changing the way business is conducted. And because of such changes, IT has become the business.

The concept of shadow IT historically meant an us vs. them civil war between IT and rogue vaguely technical groups that sprouted within various departments – unannounced and unheralded – to deploy departmentally specific solutions. Such a need harkens back to the initial break away from mainframe computing architectures, where a single locked-down system was centralized and controlled by a single entity.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How scientists are using big data to discover rare mineral deposits

CIO.com - IT industry - August 4, 2017 - 1:18pm

Big data is shaking up the ways our entrepreneurs start their businesses, our healthcare professionals deliver care, and our financial services render their transactions. Now, big data’s reach has expanded so far that it’s revolutionizing the way our scientist search for gas, oil, and even valuable minerals.

Searching under the surface of the earth for valuable mineral deposits has never been easy, but by exploiting recent innovations in big data that allow scientist to gleam the signal from the noise, experts are now capable of discovering and categorizing new minerals more efficiently than ever before.

A new type of mining

By mining big data, or by crunching huge sums of numbers to predict trends, scientist are now capable of mapping mineral deposits in new and exciting ways. Network theory, which has been used with great success in fields ranging from healthcare to national security, is one big data tool that scientist are coming to rely on more and more.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: What is the tech industry’s responsibility to talent in the age of automation?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 6:00pm

The struggle to find and hire skilled tech professionals is holding at fever pitch for most businesses today. Around the world I have seen employers take inventive and sometimes aggressive approaches to finding the data, UX, cloud, security, Web, mobile and AI experts their busy IT organizations need. Most recently, a client of mine hosted a global hackathon focused on new product and service development. While the technologists who came to the event focused on the issues and innovation at hand, recruiters and hiring managers were also out in force looking to identify candidates in the unusually target-rich environment.

What struck me as interesting is how many of these talented tech pros can and do work on technologies that are beginning to reduce and eliminate tech jobs. Take for example, cloud developers and solution experts. The level of automation being built into cloud environments today means that fewer and fewer tech experts will be needed to build and manage cloud systems. A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, “The Future of Employment,” found that “47% of workers in America have jobs at high risk of potential automation.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: What is the tech industry’s responsibility to talent in the age of automation?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 6:00pm

The struggle to find and hire skilled tech professionals is holding at fever pitch for most businesses today. Around the world I have seen employers take inventive and sometimes aggressive approaches to finding the data, UX, cloud, security, Web, mobile and AI experts their busy IT organizations need. Most recently, a client of mine hosted a global hackathon focused on new product and service development. While the technologists who came to the event focused on the issues and innovation at hand, recruiters and hiring managers were also out in force looking to identify candidates in the unusually target-rich environment.

What struck me as interesting is how many of these talented tech pros can and do work on technologies that are beginning to reduce and eliminate tech jobs. Take for example, cloud developers and solution experts. The level of automation being built into cloud environments today means that fewer and fewer tech experts will be needed to build and manage cloud systems. A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, “The Future of Employment,” found that “47% of workers in America have jobs at high risk of potential automation.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Hackers are aggressively targeting law firms' data

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 1:38pm

Behind every splashy headline is a legal industry that’s duking it out – helping to support entrepreneurs and big corporations in a power struggle to dominate their industry. From patent disputes to employment contracts, law firms have a lot of exposure to sensitive information.  Because of their involvement, confidential information is stored on the enterprise systems that law firms use.

This makes them a juicy target for hackers that want to steal consumer information and corporate intelligence.

For an example of this, look no further than the Panama Papers – “…an unprecedented leak of 11.5m files from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Hackers are aggressively targeting law firms' data

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 1:38pm

Behind every splashy headline is a legal industry that’s duking it out – helping to support entrepreneurs and big corporations in a power struggle to dominate their industry. From patent disputes to employment contracts, law firms have a lot of exposure to sensitive information.  Because of their involvement, confidential information is stored on the enterprise systems that law firms use.

This makes them a juicy target for hackers that want to steal consumer information and corporate intelligence.

For an example of this, look no further than the Panama Papers – “…an unprecedented leak of 11.5m files from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Postcards from the digital transformation of a 100-year-old startup

CIO.com - IT industry - August 2, 2017 - 6:38pm

Companies of all sizes in all industries are grappling with digital transformation. I have the pleasure of leading the innovation team at a nearly 100-year-old startup, and I’m often asked, “How do you track your progress along the journey?”

The short answer is “Everywhere, and all the time.” A digital transformation is, by definition, digital, providing numerous opportunities for tracking. But to be truly transformative, a digital transformation cannot just be about innovation or R&D, it must involve the entire enterprise. We are four years into our digital transformation at Pitney Bowes, and our milestones to date include the successful implementation of a new brand identity, a new enterprise business platform, creation of an open cloud product development platform, a robust Design System, IoT solutions for enterprise and SMB clients, digital customer communications, and many more initiatives that have transformed us into a leading global technology firm. Every day, we place the client at the center of all we do. We also know that the core of our success is our culture of innovation.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Postcards from the digital transformation of a 100-year-old startup

CIO.com - IT industry - August 2, 2017 - 6:38pm

Companies of all sizes in all industries are grappling with digital transformation. I have the pleasure of leading the innovation team at a nearly 100-year-old startup, and I’m often asked, “How do you track your progress along the journey?”

The short answer is “Everywhere, and all the time.” A digital transformation is, by definition, digital, providing numerous opportunities for tracking. But to be truly transformative, a digital transformation cannot just be about innovation or R&D, it must involve the entire enterprise. We are four years into our digital transformation at Pitney Bowes, and our milestones to date include the successful implementation of a new brand identity, a new enterprise business platform, creation of an open cloud product development platform, a robust Design System, IoT solutions for enterprise and SMB clients, digital customer communications, and many more initiatives that have transformed us into a leading global technology firm. Every day, we place the client at the center of all we do. We also know that the core of our success is our culture of innovation.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Fresh insights on the information age and cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 7:20pm

In June, I attended the TIA Connectivity Jam in Dallas, where I participated as a panel moderator and table ambassador on the topic of cybersecurity. The discussions were engaging and informative, and they introduced new ways of addressing the future of IoT, 5G, smart cities, data management, our workforce and more. Here, I share some fresh insights from the event related to the big-picture question of where the information age is taking us, along with the pressing challenge of securing our networks.

A five-category method for identifying industry leaders

I was fascinated and enlightened by the "Information Age" keynote delivered by Southern Methodist University professor Dr. Shervani, who offered a forward-thinking approach to understanding companies and identifying industry leaders in the information age.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Fresh insights on the information age and cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 7:20pm

In June, I attended the TIA Connectivity Jam in Dallas, where I participated as a panel moderator and table ambassador on the topic of cybersecurity. The discussions were engaging and informative, and they introduced new ways of addressing the future of IoT, 5G, smart cities, data management, our workforce and more. Here, I share some fresh insights from the event related to the big-picture question of where the information age is taking us, along with the pressing challenge of securing our networks.

A five-category method for identifying industry leaders

I was fascinated and enlightened by the "Information Age" keynote delivered by Southern Methodist University professor Dr. Shervani, who offered a forward-thinking approach to understanding companies and identifying industry leaders in the information age.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 reasons why innovation and technology pilots often don’t succeed

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 6:50pm

Disruption from new technologies and new business models fundamentally changes companies’ competitive positioning. Most CEOs and boards of directors today recognize their business is at risk if they don’t change, as disruptive competitors will gain ascendency over them. Because they recognize the power of disruptive technologies and the need to change, many invest in pilots to determine whether a technology can create the desired performance outcome. Unfortunately, pilots rarely deliver real value. Furthermore, look at Amazon, GE and other firms that successfully incorporate disruptive technologies into their business model, and you’ll realize they don’t use pilots to drive change. Why not?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 reasons why innovation and technology pilots often don’t succeed

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 6:50pm

Disruption from new technologies and new business models fundamentally changes companies’ competitive positioning. Most CEOs and boards of directors today recognize their business is at risk if they don’t change, as disruptive competitors will gain ascendency over them. Because they recognize the power of disruptive technologies and the need to change, many invest in pilots to determine whether a technology can create the desired performance outcome. Unfortunately, pilots rarely deliver real value. Furthermore, look at Amazon, GE and other firms that successfully incorporate disruptive technologies into their business model, and you’ll realize they don’t use pilots to drive change. Why not?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Technology addiction is a new language – do you know what it says?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 6:43pm

I recently sat down to chat with Abinash Tripathy, CEO and founder of Helpshift, with the ostensible purpose of discussing customer service and machine learning. But our chat took an interesting turn when he mentioned his daughter’s technological fluency. Tripathy traced the ways in which she and her friends interact with their devices to the emotional response that he remembers accompanying the early days of messaging. His conclusion: technology addiction has formed an entire language, one that the coming generations are completely fluent in.

How the AOL slamming door started a full-blown addiction

In the late 1990s kids learned two new signifiers, the creaking door noise notifying an AOL user that a friend came online and the slammed door when a friend left. This may have been the earliest example of awareness indicators – signals that your conversation partner is present or not.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Technology addiction is a new language – do you know what it says?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 6:43pm

I recently sat down to chat with Abinash Tripathy, CEO and founder of Helpshift, with the ostensible purpose of discussing customer service and machine learning. But our chat took an interesting turn when he mentioned his daughter’s technological fluency. Tripathy traced the ways in which she and her friends interact with their devices to the emotional response that he remembers accompanying the early days of messaging. His conclusion: technology addiction has formed an entire language, one that the coming generations are completely fluent in.

How the AOL slamming door started a full-blown addiction

In the late 1990s kids learned two new signifiers, the creaking door noise notifying an AOL user that a friend came online and the slammed door when a friend left. This may have been the earliest example of awareness indicators – signals that your conversation partner is present or not.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

An inside look at today’s top tech employers

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 11:00am

In a tight IT talent market, companies that treat their employees well maintain a competitive edge. By keeping their tech talent engaged, motivated and, yes, well-compensated, companies that focus on employee well-being attract and retain top talent at greater rates.

But you don’t have to be a Google or Facebook to attract and retain the best. A recent research survey from PayScale, “Tech Companies Compared: Salaries, Tenure and Corporate Culture,” reveals surprising insights into the workplace, hiring and retention habits of 52 top tech companies, providing CIOs and IT leaders an inside look at how to effectively attract and retain tech talent.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

An inside look at today’s top tech employers

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 11:00am

In a tight IT talent market, companies that treat their employees well maintain a competitive edge. By keeping their tech talent engaged, motivated and, yes, well-compensated, companies that focus on employee well-being attract and retain top talent at greater rates.

But you don’t have to be a Google or Facebook to attract and retain the best. A recent research survey from PayScale, “Tech Companies Compared: Salaries, Tenure and Corporate Culture,” reveals surprising insights into the workplace, hiring and retention habits of 52 top tech companies, providing CIOs and IT leaders an inside look at how to effectively attract and retain tech talent.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Data governance in the world of “data everywhere”

CIO.com - IT industry - July 31, 2017 - 12:55pm

In the world of “data everywhere”, Data Governance is becoming even more important.  Organizations that develop a data warehouse ‘single source of truth’ need data governance to ensure that a Standard Business Language (SBL) is developed and agreed to, and the various sources of data are integrated with consistent and reliable definitions and business rules.  Decisions around who can use what data and validations that the data being used and how it’s used meets regulatory and compliance requirements are important.

As the enterprise data management solutions grow and broaden, incorporating Enterprise Application Integration (EAI), Master Data Management (MDM), increasing use of external data, real time data solutions, data lakes, cloud, etc. Data Governance is even more important.  While there may be value in having data, if it’s not accurate, no-one can use it and it isn’t managed, then the value of the data, wherever it resides, diminishes greatly.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Here’s how companies can reach post-millennials through blogging

CIO.com - IT industry - July 31, 2017 - 12:51pm

Today’s young adults missed the blogging boom, with many of them opting to share their thoughts through photos, videos, and short status updates. For businesses, however, blogging is an essential way to keep fresh content on their websites, ensuring they rank well in the search results that often send customers their way.

But those born between the mid-1990s and the mid-2000s are a serious force in the retail landscape. Also known as Generation Z and centennials, post-millennials currently occupy our nation’s high schools and colleges, soon to follow millennials into the workplace. For the retailers who have been chasing the $65 billion in yearly buying power that millennials bring, this means it’s time to shift focus. How do entrepreneurs reach out to a generation that spends more leisure time on apps like Snapchat and Instagram than conducting Google searches on a computer?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How CIOs can avoid the next ransomware attack

CIO.com - IT industry - July 31, 2017 - 12:49pm

No question about it, ransomware is on the rise, and the majority of enterprises remain vulnerable to inbound phish emails that often are the originators of ransomware attacks.

One recent ransomware outbreak, Petya, appears to have originated in the Ukraine. Like WannaCry before it, once it has infected a computer it attempts to spread through local area networks. But according to the Romanian national CERT (Computer Emergency Readiness Team) Petya’s initial point of entry is often a phishing email that contains a Trojan-horse document which, if opened, will infect the target computer. “Initial infection of systems is achieved through documents attached to phishing email messages that users are urged to open,” according to the Romanian publication Business Review.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Technology-led innovation in digital health: The law of inverse relationships

CIO.com - IT industry - July 28, 2017 - 1:07pm

While researching for my upcoming book, I asked the nationally recognized CIO of a health system what he thought of the market for emerging technologies such as AI, cognitive, blockchain and digital health solutions in healthcare. His response was: The teacher is ready, but the student is not.

What he meant was that the technology vendor community is developing innovative solutions at a faster rate than the ability of the healthcare sector to adopt it.

It’s no secret that healthcare IT is a couple of steps behind other sectors such as banking and retailing. I have been keenly noting the seeming contrasts in the outlook for healthcare IT when I speak with healthcare industry executives and technology providers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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