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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
28%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
10%
1200 - 1500 GB
10%
1500 - 2000 GB
13%
> 2000 GB
20%
Total votes: 40

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Industry & Technology

China's moon lander sprouted a plant, but now it's dead - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 11:31pm
The Chang'e 4 lander's biosphere habitat hosted a short-lived cotton-growing experiment.

'It's like they took a rug and covered it up': Flight booking web app used by scores of airlines still vuln to attack – claim

The Register - January 15, 2019 - 11:26pm
Security hole can still be exploited to tamper with journeys, warn infosec bods

Exclusive A security hole in a widely used airline reservation system remains open to exploit, allowing miscreants to edit strangers' travel details online, The Register has learned. A fix to close the vulnerability was incomplete, and thus ineffective, it is claimed.…

Psychologists defend claim of “destructive aspects” to masculinity

Ars Technica - January 15, 2019 - 11:20pm

Enlarge (credit: Getty | Photofusion)

The American Psychological Association is on the defensive over its newly released clinical guidance (PDF) for treating boys and men, which links traditional masculinity ideology to a range of harms, including sexism, violence, mental health issues, suicide, and homophobia. Critics contend that the guidelines attack traditional values and innate characteristics of males.

The APA’s 10-point guidance, released last week, is intended to help practicing psychologists address the varied yet gendered experience of men and boys with whom they work. It fits into the APA’s set of other clinical guidelines for working with specific groups, including older adults, people with disabilities, and one for girls and women, which was released in 2007. The association began working on the guidance for boys and men in 2005—well before the current #MeToo era—and drew from more than four decades of research for its framing and recommendations.

That research showed that “some masculine social norms can have negative consequences for the health of boys and men,” the APA said in a statement released January 14 amid backlash. Key among these harmful norms is pressure for boys to suppress their emotions (the “common ‘boys don’t cry’ refrain”), the APA said. This has been documented to lead to “increased negative risk-taking and inappropriate aggression among men and boys, factors that can put some males at greater risk for psychological and physical health problems.” It can also make males “less willing to seek help for psychological distress.”

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Someone built a computer inside a mouse, and it's super cute - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 11:14pm
It may not be highly functional, but it is highly adorable.

Intel reported to have a new 5GHz chip that’s literally priceless

Ars Technica - January 15, 2019 - 11:07pm

Enlarge / This is a 10-core Skylake-X processor. It uses the low core count (LCC) version of the Skylake-SP die. (credit: Fritzchens Fritz / Flickr)

If the $1,979 Core i9-9980XE isn't enough processor for you, Anandtech reports that Intel will soon have an even more expensive Core i9 processor: the i9-9990XE. But you won't be able to buy it, and Intel won't even have a price for the thing.

The current i9-9980XE has 18 cores/36 threads and clock speeds between 3.0 and 4.5GHz, and it draws 165W. The new i9-9990XE has fewer cores—14 cores/28 thread, same as a 9940X—but it boasts clock speeds between 4.0 and 5.0GHz, with a monstrous power draw of 255W. It will use the existing LGA2066 socket and X299 chipset. This configuration is still a long way off the one that Intel teased in the middle of last year, when the company demonstrated an overclocked machine with 28 cores running 5GHz across all cores.

The price of this new chip is likely to sit above that of the 9980XE, but where exactly isn't clear. According to Anandtech, Intel won't be selling this chip through regular retail channels, and it won't have a regular list price. Instead, the chip company is asking system builders to bid for the chips in an online auction. The auctions will be held quarterly, with apparently only three system integrators bidding in the first.

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The best stuff you can get for under $30 - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:59pm
Have some spare gift cards? Just looking to treat yourself? Here are some great ideas that won't break the bank.

Apple now makes smart battery cases for the iPhone XS and XR - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:57pm
For a chunk of change -- and a battery bulge -- you'll get some more power.

Chinese firm scores a win in smallsat-launch competition

Ars Technica - January 15, 2019 - 10:55pm

Enlarge / Satellogic satellites being prepared for launch. (credit: Satellogic)

China’s new Long March 6 rocket has won a major commercial launch contract, with an agreement for up to six flights over two years to deploy 90 small remote sensing satellites for Argentina-based Satellogic.

The contract—which will allow Satellogic to deploy a constellation capable of imaging the entire planet at a 1-meter resolution on a weekly basis—is significant in that it comes at a time of increasing competition in the small-satellite launch market. Satellogic and the China Great Wall Industry Corporation (or CGWIC), which sells Chinese government launch services on the commercial market, did not disclose terms of the agreement.

However, the Chinese launch marketer made clear that this is an important milestone for its Long March 6 (or LM-6) rocket. "Satellogic's constellation will introduce a new era of affordable Earth observation just as the LM-6 will open new opportunities for the global space industry," Gao Ruofei, executive vice president of CGWIC, said in a statement.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ahem, Amazon, Google, Microsoft... Selling face-snooping tech to the Feds is bad, mmm'kay?

The Register - January 15, 2019 - 10:51pm
Government facial surveillance harms civil liberties, advocacy groups warn

The campaign against Uncle Sam's use of facial recognition stepped up a notch this week: scores of rights-warriors have urged Amazon, Google, and Microsoft to cease selling the panopticon tech to the US government.…

Avengers: Endgame countdown hits 100 days, so here are some wild theories - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:46pm
After Infinity War was released, we made some guesses about what might happen next.

Spider-Man's Mysterio: Here's how the villain has evolved in the comics - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:31pm
A look at the history of the fishbowl-headed illusionist, played by Jake Gyllenhaal in Spider-Man: Far From Home.

Nine defendants charged in SEC hacking scheme that netted $4.1 million

Ars Technica - January 15, 2019 - 10:30pm

Enlarge (credit: Brendan Smialowski / Getty Images)

Federal authorities have charged nine defendants with participating in a scheme to hack a Securities and Exchange Commission database to steal confidential information that netted $4.1 million in illegal stock trade profits.

Two of the defendants, federal prosecutors in New Jersey said, breached SEC networks starting in May 2016 by subjecting them to hacks that included directory traversal, phishing attacks, and infecting computers with malware. From there, the defendants allegedly accessed EDGAR (the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system) and stole nonpublic earnings reports that publicly traded companies had filed with the commission. The hackers then passed the confidential information to individuals who used it to trade in the narrow window between when the files were stolen and when the companies released the information to the public.

“Defendants’ scheme reaped over $4.1 million in gross ill-gotten gains from trading based on nonpublic EDGAR filings,” SEC officials charged in a civil complaint. It named Ukrainian nationalist Oleksandr Ieremenko as a hacker, along with six individual traders in California, Ukraine, and Russia, and it also named two entities. A criminal complaint filed by federal prosecutors in New Jersey charged Ieremenko and a separate Ukrainian named Artem Radchenko with carrying out the hack.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google to yoink apps with an unauthorized Call Log or SMS habit from Android Play Store

The Register - January 15, 2019 - 10:25pm
'We take access to sensitive data and permissions very seriously...' No giggling, please

Paul Bankhead, director of product management at Google, has told programmers that apps in the Play Store that want access to SMS or Call Logs will start being removed unless the ad-slinger has OK'd the given developer's justification.…

Amazon Fire TV Stick gets Alexa TV control remote, still costs $40 - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:24pm
The 2019 version of the Amazon's cheapest streamer tries to one-up the Roku Streaming Stick. We go hands-on.

Google workers urge tech giants to drop forced arbitration - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:14pm
It’s the first major protest of the year from tech workers.

Polk will have the first sound bar to support Alexa multiroom - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 10:12pm
Polk's Command Bar arrives early to the whole-home Alexa party.

Sprint unveils T-Mobile-like rewards program, kicks it off with free pizza - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 9:59pm
Customers can score a large Papa John's pie and other perks -- including cash back on store purchases.

Apple Maps gooses DuckDuckGo in search privacy partnership - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 9:58pm
The maps that show up on iPhones are now used on the privacy-first search engine, too.

Upskirting to be crime after Lords back bill

BBC Technology News - January 15, 2019 - 9:56pm
A woman took her campaign to MPs after a man took pictures of her at a gig in London's Hyde Park.

2019 Mercedes-Benz A-Class Sedan starts at $32,500 - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - January 15, 2019 - 9:55pm
Adding all-wheel drive will cost an extra $2,000.

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