Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News > RSS Newsfeeds > Categories

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
28%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
7%
1200 - 1500 GB
7%
1500 - 2000 GB
13%
> 2000 GB
24%
Total votes: 71

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
Industry & Technology

The year-long rash of supply chain attacks against open source is getting worse

Ars Technica - August 21, 2019 - 12:35pm

(credit: Wired UK/Shuttershock)

A rash of supply chain attacks hitting open source software over the past year shows few signs of abating, following the discovery this week of two separate backdoors slipped into a dozen libraries downloaded by hundreds of thousands of server administrators.

The first backdoor to come to light was in Webmin, a Web-based administration tool with more than 1 million installations. Sometime around April of last year, according to Webmin developer Jamie Cameron, someone compromised the server used to develop new versions of the program. The attacker then used the access to distribute a backdoor that was downloaded more than 900,000 times and may have been actively used by tens of thousands of Internet-facing servers.

The unknown attacker made a subtle change to a Webmin script called password_change.cgi. The change gave attackers the ability to send a command through a special URL that an infected Webmin server would then execute with root privileges. In version 1.890, which had more than 421,000 downloads between June, 2018 and last weekend, the backdoor was turned on by default. On versions 1.90, 1.91, 1.91, and 1.92—which collectively had more than 942,000 downloads—the backdoor was active only when admins changed a default setting that allowed expired passwords to be changed. Backdoored versions were distributed on SourceForge, which is the primary distribution source the Webmin website points to.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Remembering the best shareware-era DOS games that time forgot

Ars Technica - August 21, 2019 - 12:30pm

Enlarge / A DOS prompt.

Welcome to Ars Gaming Week 2019! As a staff full of gamers and game-lovers, we'll be serving up extra reviews, guides, interviews, and other stories all about gaming from August 19 to August 23.

Anyone who has played games a lot has a favorite era that set their expectations and defined what they would find fun for years to come. But it's difficult to talk about classic computer games without dating yourself—either as younger or older—and whether an era counts as "classic" or formative depends on the individual.

In my case, the formative glory days were the 1980s and early '90s, and the platform was MS-DOS. And while I did play popular commercial releases from publishers like Apogee and Epic, I mostly played shareware releases. Today, we're going to look at some gems of that lost era.

Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Guidemaster: The best gaming headsets for your console or gaming rig

Ars Technica - August 21, 2019 - 12:20pm

Enlarge / Just an armful of the gaming headsets we tested. (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Welcome to Ars Gaming Week 2019! As a staff full of gamers and game-lovers, we'll be serving up extra reviews, guides, interviews, and other stories all about gaming from August 19 to August 23.

Most people can meet their gaming audio needs with a good pair of headphones. But if you play lots of multiplayer games or frequently use your console/rig to chat with friends, a good gaming headset and its included microphone will make more sense. Unfortunately, the market for gaming headsets remains riddled with junky hardware.

So for Ars Gaming Week, we're getting you some help. We spent the last three months testing 30 gaming headsets to find the ones most worth buying. Below you can find our current favorites, including options for those on a budget, those with cash to burn, and those who want to go wireless. And, like with all of our Guidemasters, you can consider this a living guide—we’ll be sure to update it as new standouts arrive.

Read 41 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tesla sued by Walmart over solar panel fires

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:18pm
The supermarket chain alleges that Tesla was negligent in the way the solar panels were installed.

Guidemaster: The best Nintendo Switch accessories you can buy in 2019

Ars Technica - August 21, 2019 - 12:15pm

Enlarge / You can do a lot with this little guy. (credit: Jeff Dunn)

Welcome to Ars Gaming Week 2019! As a staff full of gamers and game-lovers, we'll be serving up extra reviews, guides, interviews, and other stories all about gaming from August 19 to August 23.

The Nintendo Switch is one of the most inventive pieces of consumer tech in recent memory, but a few good accessories can make it more practical on a daily basis. And to prepare for Ars Gaming Week, we've spent the past couple of months researching and testing various controllers, chargers, adapters, and all sorts of additional gadgets to figure out which of those accessories are most worth buying.

Note that all testing was done on an original Switch console, not the newer model with improved battery life (and a few other significant upgrades) or the forthcoming Switch Lite, which has Joy-Con controllers that are not detachable. We'll upgrade this guide in the future as more standout accessories hit the market (I’m still waiting on a worthwhile Switch headset, for one), but here's how to optimize everyone's favorite handheld right now.

Read 45 remaining paragraphs | Comments

GameStop lays off 120 corporate staffers as stock continues to tumble

Ars Technica - August 21, 2019 - 1:16am

Brightly lit GameStop storefront. (credit: JeepersMedia / Flickr)

Major video game retailer GameStop has announced layoffs for 120 corporate staffers, representing a 14% reduction of the company's "total associate base at our company headquarters as well as at some other offices."

“While these changes are difficult, they were necessary to reduce costs and better align the organization with our efforts to optimize the business to meet our future objectives and success factors," GameStop said in a statement. "We recognize that this is a difficult day for our company and particularly for those associates impacted. We appreciate their dedication and service to GameStop and are committed to supporting them during this time of transition.”

It's unclear if that number includes staffers at GameStop-owned Game Informer magazine, many of whom took to Twitter today to share news of their unexpected layoffs. Of the 19 staffers listed on the magazine's masthead at least six were let go today, including Managing Editor Matt Bertz.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Millions of old gadgets 'stockpiled in drawers'

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 1:15am
Public urged to "recycle their tech" as rare, valuable materials in millions of old devices languish in UK homes.

The Cold War spy technology which we all use

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:21am
Radio-frequency identification, famously used to bug the US embassy in Moscow, is a cheap way to track objects and data.

#BulletJournal: Seven million beautiful ways to save money

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:17am
#BulletJournal: The new trend that is helping people to save money.

Barclays tops list of banks with most IT shutdowns

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:10am
British banks experienced more than 10 outages a month in the past year, BBC analysis of new data reveals.

Ready to upgrade? What to do about your old phone

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:01am
Unwanted devices can contain elements that the world is running out of - so how can you help?

'I bought a house thanks to my bullet journal'

BBC Technology News - August 21, 2019 - 12:00am
Millions of people have shared #bulletjournal or #bujo hashtags on Instagram, so how do they work?

Apple TV+ will launch in November for $9.99, facing off against Disney+ at $6.99

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 10:52pm

Enlarge / Tim Cook announces Apple TV+ at an event on March 25, 2019. (credit: Ron Amadeo)

Disney earlier this year announced that it will launch its Disney+ streaming TV service on November 12 in the United States for $6.99 per month. Yesterday, Bloomberg's Mark Gurman published a report claiming that Apple's competing TV service, Apple TV+, will also launch in November, but likely at $9.99.

Both companies are entering an increasingly crowded streaming TV landscape that already includes the likes of HBO, Netflix, CBS, Showtime, and Starz, among others, and will soon see other major entries like HBO Max, offerings from AT&T, and offerings from NBC Universal.

According to the Bloomberg report, which cites people familiar with Apple's plans, Apple TV+ will launch with a "small selection of shows," including The Morning Show, Amazing Stories, See, Truth Be Told, and a documentary series about houses called Home. Apple is still mulling over prices, the report says, but is leaning toward $9.99.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook audit of alleged anti-conservative bias fails to pinpoint any

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 10:39pm

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | NurPhoto )

Following years of accusations that it stifles right-wing speech, Facebook has published an audit failing to show any particular anti-conservative bias, and some conservatives are furious.

Law firm Covington & Burling LLP conducted the audit under the auspices of former Sen. John Kyl, a Republican who served in the US Senate representing Arizona from 1995-2013 and again for several months in 2018 following the death of Republican Sen. John McCain. The interim report (PDF), released today, seeks to reconcile the different ways Facebook sorts and presents content to its billions of users with users' perception of biased or quashed material.

Conservative politicians have for years been complaining that Facebook suppresses right-wing speech, despite nonpartisan data showing that conservative outlet Fox News is far and away the biggest English-language publisher on Facebook by user engagement. Fellow right-wing outlets Daily Wire and Breitbart also feature prominently among the top sites by engagement, mixed in among mainstream news outlets such as NBC, the BBC, CBS, and The New York Times.

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

With Artemis, NASA at risk of repeating Apollo mistakes, scientist warns

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 10:10pm

Enlarge / The surface of the Moon as seen from Apollo 11 while in lunar orbit. (credit: NASA)

In the nearly five months that have passed since Vice President Mike Pence directed NASA to return humans to the Moon by 2024, the space agency has made significant progress toward that goal.

During this time and under the leadership of administrator Jim Bridenstine, the agency has let contracts for both the elements of the Lunar Gateway, the small space station that will follow a distant orbit around the Moon. NASA has also begun to solicit ideas from industry about their designs for a three-stage lunar lander, upon which construction could begin sometime in 2020. The agency is also soliciting cargo deliveries to the Moon.

These are big steps, and getting a large agency like NASA moving quickly is difficult. For all of this, however, there are storm clouds on the horizon. Most obviously, there is the matter of paying for the Artemis Program to put humans on the Moon—the US House did not including funding for this effort in its preliminary fiscal year 2020 budget, and the Senate has yet to draft a budget. If there is not additional funding, NASA cannot give industry funds to go and do the work.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The Matrix 4 is officially happening with Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 9:58pm

Enlarge / We assume the next Matrix film's title will be different than this. But will it be better? After "Reloaded" and "Revolutions," well, we don't know. (credit: Aurich Lawson)

It's official: the Matrix film series is coming back with a fourth numbered entry. And it will see the return of original trilogy stars Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss to their respective roles as Neo and Trinity.

Lana Wachowski, who served as co-writer and co-director for all three original trilogy films alongside sibling Lilly, has been confirmed as the sole Wachowski family member (so far) in the writer/director chair. Wachowski will be joined by Aleksandar Hemon and David Mitchell as co-writers, whose names will likely be familiar to Wachowski fans. Mitchell's novel Cloud Atlas was eventually developed into a feature-length film by the Wachowskis, while Mitchell and Hemon co-wrote much of the Wachowski-helmed Netflix series Sense8.

Warner Bros. Pictures chairman Toby Emmerich on Tuesday gave an official statement on the matter, telling Variety, "We could not be more excited to be re-entering The Matrix with Lana... We are thrilled that she is writing, directing and producing this new chapter in The Matrix universe." In the same report, Wachowski told Variety, "Many of the ideas Lilly and I explored 20 years ago about our reality are even more relevant now. I'm very happy to have these characters back in my life and grateful for another chance to work with my brilliant friends."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

AT&T brings cable TV prices to online streaming with $135 monthly plan

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 7:55pm

Enlarge / An AT&T store in Chicago. (credit: Getty Images | jetcityimage)

AT&T is now charging up to $135 a month for the online video service formerly known as DirecTV Now.

DirecTV Now launched in 2016 with plans ranging from $35 to $70 a month for 60 to 120 channels. There have been several price increases and a reduction in the number of channels since, resulting in AT&T offering just two packages of $50 a month for 45 channels and $70 a month for 60 channels.

This week, AT&T completed the name change from DirecTV Now to "AT&T TV Now." The $50 and $70 plans still exist, but AT&T TV Now customers can also get 65 channels for $93 a month, 85 channels for $110, 105 channels for $124, or 125 channels for $135. There's also a Spanish-language plan called Óptimo Más with 90 channels for $86 a month.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The death of “Works with Nest” begins now with Google account migrations

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 7:42pm

Enlarge / Coming soon to a Nest near you: Your Google account. (credit: Google Nest)

The smart home company Nest is currently in the middle of a rocky transition from standalone Alphabet company to a full-on merger with Google's hardware team, where it will exist as a Google sub-brand. The details were announced during Google I/O 2019 and include the debut of the first "Google Nest" product, the shutdown of the "Works with Nest" (WWN) ecosystem, and the death of standalone Nest accounts and the Nest/Google data separation. Until now, the transition has mostly involved news and new products, but now a recent update to the Nest app will let existing Nest users "migrate their account to Google." Be warned that doing this will break a lot of things and is irreversible.

So far, it looks like the Nest-to-Google transition more or less involves shutting down everything that was unique to Nest and switching to the Google Home/Google Assistant ecosystem. Migrating your Nest account to a Google account basically means jumping ecosystems, leaving behind any "Works with Nest" integrations with other apps or devices. Basic things like the Nest app, website, and Google voice commands will still work, but that's about it. Amazon Alexa users will probably see the current "Works with Nest" skill stop working, but apparently there is a new "Google Nest" skill that will replace some of the functionality.

Google's support page on the transition warns that the process "is not reversible" and that "During the migration process, you will need to remove and disconnect all your WWN third-party product connections (also not reversible)." This means you'll have to take careful stock of your Nest integrations before you switch and make sure you know what will and won't break. If you mess up, there's no going back.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Super-Earth at a nearby star is a Mercury-like hunk of rock

Ars Technica - August 20, 2019 - 7:02pm

Enlarge / An artist's view of what's undoubtedly the cooler side of the planet. (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt)

The most common star in our galaxy is a red dwarf, smaller and dimmer than the Sun. Because these small stars put out much less radiation, the region where planets could have liquid water on their surfaces is much closer to the star. In these exosolar systems, the habitable zone is typically closer to the star than Mercury is to our Sun.

That's a good match to our current technology, which is best at identifying planets close to their host stars. But it has raised questions about whether these close-in planets could actually be habitable, given that red dwarf stars are prone to violent outbursts. Now, researchers have taken a close look at a planet orbiting close to a red dwarf and have found that it looks like a bare rock, suggesting that its star may have stripped off any atmosphere that once existed.

Redistribution

Studying the atmosphere of an exoplanet typically involves observations of it creating a partial eclipse of its host star. In these cases, some of the starlight passes through the planet's atmosphere, allowing us to get a sense of its composition. If there's no sign of this sort of change, then we typically infer that the planet doesn't have an atmosphere.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google sign language AI turns hand gestures into speech

BBC Technology News - August 20, 2019 - 6:36pm
The tech giant is sharing its hand-tracking software to allow others to develop translation apps.

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 21:46.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com